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This guide describes the Community Potluck events that have been hosted by Network of Wellbeing, in Totnes (UK). The aim of this document is to offer information and inspiration to help you to run similar activity in your own community. Considering the “Five ways to Wellbeing” developed by nef (new economics foundation), this event offers an opportunity for people to connect by meeting new people in their own community, learn a bit more about each other and about the concept of wellbeing by exploring the theme over conversations, give contributions towards the meal as well as potentially also offering time to help organise the event, be active by going to a new place to do something different and take notice of what their own community has to offer. So check out this informative guide, and find out how you could create a Community Potluck in your own area!
It’s important to take care of yourself and get the most from life. This booklet suggests 10 practical ways to look after your mental health. Making simple changes to how you live doesn’t need to cost a fortune or take up loads of time. Anyone can follow this advice. Why not start today?
Looking after your wellbeing helps you get the most out of life. Exercise and physical activity play a crucial role in how you feel about yourself and life.Whatever your age, the benefits of an active lifestyle can soon be felt. This booklet explains why exercise is important, suggests how you can get started and stay motivated.
Over three and a half years, the Well London programme empowered some of the capital’s most deprived communities to take a proactive role in enhancing their health and wellbeing. Within this programme, there were a number of strands of work with Be Creative Be Well representing the importance of art and creativity in health agendas. This report is an independent evaluation of Be Creative Be Well, looking at the impact that the quality of the arts and cultural activity can have in community engagement and in improving health and wellbeing.
Thrive is a national charity that uses gardening to change lives. We champion the benefits of gardening, carry out research and offer training and practical solutions so that anyone with a disability can take part in, benefit from and enjoy gardening. The Growing 4 Life project was set up with the support of Ecominds and the Big Lottery to work with older people with mental health support needs, using the therapeutic powers of gardening to help people regain confidence, build self esteem and motivation as well as creating new social networks. Through participation in the project people will have a direct impact on their local environment by creating better local green spaces. The project also looked at creating an environment where participants felt able to continue working in the green space as part of a self support peer group. The learning outcomes and evidence gained through delivery of this project has been used to produce this free resource guide to setting up a community garden project for people affected by mental ill-health.
This report focuses on resilience; setting out the types of services, resources and infrastructure that need to be in place locally to support resilient communities, helping people to ‘feel good and function well’. It will be of interest to those who commission (or aim to influence the commissioning of) local services, those who provide services that impact on the wellbeing and resilience of their local community and those who use these services.
This ‘How to’ guide is one of a series designed to bring together learning from the five-year Right Here programme initiated by Paul Hamlyn Foundation and the Mental Health Foundation. This particular guide is aimed at youth organisations working with young people, to help to embed mental wellbeing improvement practices within the organisations.
This document is presented in a way that it: • Illustrates the journey of the initial Asset Based approach in Wakefield. • Draws together the ‘research’ of the Asset Based data for analysis and review. • Provides illustrative examples to guide future activity for Asset Based and Co- production Approaches - through to potential commissioning. • Draws together the links between Asset Based/Co Production approaches and the development of the JSNA.
This report presents key findings from the Sovereign Wellbeing Index about the wellbeing of New Zealand adults in late 2012. The survey is the first national representation of how New Zealanders are faring on a personal and social level. The Sovereign Wellbeing Index provides a much needed look into how New Zealanders are coping within the economic conditions. Wellbeing around New Zealand - Using flourishing as a measure of wellbeing there were small but consistent effects of gender, age and income. Older, female and wealthier New Zealanders on average showed higher flourishing scores. Similar findings were found across all other measures of wellbeing giving some confidence in the convergence of measures. - There were only small differences in average flourishing scores between ethnic groups (NZ European slightly higher than Asian) and regions across New Zealand. - Social position was a powerful indicator of wellbeing. Those higher on the social ladder reported much higher wellbeing. - The five Winning Ways to Wellbeing were all strongly associated with higher wellbeing. People who socially connected with others (Connect), gave time and resources to others (Give), were able to appreciate and take notice of things around them (Take notice), were learning new things in their life (Keep learning), and were physically active (Be Active) experienced higher levels of wellbeing
This report reveals that youngers teenagers have lower well-being than other age groups in most aspects of their lives. The findings come from our eight-year, ground-breaking programme of research, in collaboration with the University of York, to explore and measure children’s subjective well-being. This is the second in our series of annual reports to outline what we know about the quality of children’s lives – as rated by children themselves. What does the report say? So far, we have run surveys and consultations with over 42,000 children aged eight and above. 
Commissioned by the Government's Foresight project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing, this report recommends five ways towards well-being. It presents the evidence and rationale between each of the five ways, drawing on a wealth of psychological literature.
A new animation exploring the 5 Ways to well-being. Richmond Fellowship has worked with CWP to create a highly original animation "Take 5". Created by 43 participants, the animation explores 5 individual themes to well-being: Connect, Take Notice, Keep Learning, Give and Be Active.
This animation was made to illustrate how engaging in creative activities can contribute to our wellbeing. Through 5 short stories, the animation demonstrates how easy it is to combine creativity and the 5 Ways to Wellbeing and how we can all benefit from incorporating both into our daily lives. The animation was created by Richmond Fellowship's (RF) Creative Arts Programme. Now in its second year, the Programme is designed to further the recovery of people who use RF's Services through engagement in creative projects.