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Funded by the European Commission (EC) LIFE+ programme, LiveWell for LIFE is a ground-breaking project that not only set out to show how low carbon diets can help achieve a reduction of at least 25% in greenhouse gas emissions from the EU food supply chain but also showed how these can be healthy, nutritious and affordable. The project also aimed to influence policies and practices to ease the adoption of low-carbon diets in the EU – and in particular in our pilot countries: France, Spain and Sweden – and ultimately, to put the issue of sustainable diets on the EU policy agenda.
Strong evidence now exists of the need to shift diets towards reduced levels of meat-eating among high consuming countries like the UK to help address climate change, promote public health and help feed the world more fairly and humanely. But understanding how to achieve this dietary behaviour change has not yet received the attention it deserves. This report intends to stimulate engagement and action towards addressing this important question. Eating Better has undertaken a review of relevant consumption patterns, trends, and people’s attitudes and behaviours. We identify ten drivers that could provide opportunities for encouraging dietary shifts. We also highlight research and policy gaps and make recommendations.
There has never been such a crying need for a bold vision of the future. If we fail to reverse the policies that have been driving climate change, we face disaster on a world scale. Yet since the 1980s, radical politics has lost its vision of how to create a qualitatively better society for everyone and lost the ability to inspire. In ‘A Convenient Truth’ Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett set out a path towards a society that’s better for us and the planet. Inequality drives status insecurity, which fuels the consumerism that is destroying our planet. But the things we buy aren’t making us any happier: the link between economic development and real improvements in quality of life is broken in rich societies. For real improvements in wellbeing, we need a more equal society, which is best achieved by putting democracy at the heart of the economy. Indeed, the authors see the extension of democracy into economic institutions as the next major step in the long project of human emancipation.
In Transition 2.0 is an inspirational immersion in the Transition movement, gathering stories from around the world of ordinary people doing extraordinary things. You'll hear about communities printing their own money, growing food, localising their economies and setting up community power stations. It's an idea that has gone viral, a social experiment that is about responding to uncertain times with solutions and optimism. In a world of increasing uncertainty, here is a story of hope, ingenuity and the power of growing vegetables in unexpected places.
This Green Paper makes the case for a Nature and Wellbeing Act for England to halt the decline in nature and speed its recovery, for the benefit of people and our environment. We need a new legal commitment to the restoration of nature for the next generation. To achieve this ambition, we need new laws to ensure protection and enhancement of nature as an investment in our nation’s prosperity. We need to reconnect people with nature. From the local level up, the enhancement of our natural environment would be realised through local visions of how, where and why more nature can be delivered through planning and spending decisions. Nature’s recovery would bring a range of benefits, not least, for our health and wellbeing. Inactivity and obesity are escalating; poor mental health is having a significant impact on wellbeing; climate change is already affecting our urban areas and the productivity of our countryside; many of our villages, towns and cities face growing risk of flooding; and our economy continues to use many of our natural “assets” in an unsustainable way, which is likely to be a brake on progress and development in the future. The list is long.
Totnes and District is feeling the effects of the economic downturn, along with the rest of the country. Climate change impacts and rising energy costs are further signs that the assumptions underpinning our current economic system need urgent review. Here we have an unusually independent economy. Rather than sacrifice that by pursuing growth at any cost, here we suggest that protecting and enhancing this economy is where our future lies. But how will this provide the jobs we all need to survive? This report identifies a multi-million pound opportunity to create new jobs, grow new enterprises and help existing businesses to thrive. It’s people-based, community-led, sustainable economic development that provides new livelihoods. At the same time, it helps ensure we can feed ourselves, minimise our fuel bills and carbon emissions,provide safer refuge for our savings and pensions and take care of those most in need. This work brings together a coalition of local stakeholder organisations, anchored here in our community, to develop an economic approach designed specifically for Totnes and District (T&D), and shows that we can unite to deliver real change.
Welcome to the UK’s top twenty “Transition oriented” social enterprises. Combined these enterprises have a turnover of £3.5 million and provide paid employment for more than 100 people. We think they’re rather brilliant examples of people just doing stuff. Each of these enterprises demonstrates a different way of working from business as usual – they are sustainable, offer some social benefits and have shared ownership, while providing essential goods and services for the community in which they make their home. They provide jobs for local people, as well as volunteering opportunities, and they buy from other local independent business. Most have emerged from a local Transition group or have links to Transition in some way.
The commissioned paper from Alex Evans and Jules Evans of the NYU Center on International Cooperation, New York and Centre for the History of the Emotions, Queen Mary University of London is now available. The paper begins by providing a brief overview of resource scarcity issues in the four areas of food, water, land and energy, in each case focusing primarily on the global level and setting out the basic supply and demand drivers involved.
The report investigates the threats and opportunities for the country from climate change, focusing on the risks to infrastructure, business and public health. It also provides an update on previous analysis on flooding, and considers the current capacity in the emergency response system to handle climate extremes.
This report explores the pressures on the global food system between now and 2050. It identifies the decisions that policy makers need to take today, and in the years ahead, to ensure that a global population rising to 9 billion or more can be fed in a fair and sustainable way. The Project has identified and analysed five key challenges for the future. Addressing these in a pragmatic way that promotes resilience to shocks and future uncertainties will be vital if major stresses to the food system are to be anticipated and managed. The five challengesare: A. Balancing future demand and supply sustainably – to ensure that food supplies are affordable. B. Ensuring that there is adequate stability in food supplies – and protecting the most vulnerable from the volatility that does occur. C. Achieving global access to food and ending hunger. This recognises that producing enough food in the world so that everyone can potentially be fed is not the same thing as ensuring food security for all D. Managing the contribution of the food system to the mitigation of climate change. E. Maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services while feeding the world. These last two challenges recognise that food production already dominates much of the global land surface and water bodies, and has a major impact on all the Earth’s environmental systems.
Climate Change and Lifestyles is the first in a series of guidebooks supporting the UNESCO/ UNEP YouthXchange (YXC) Initiative, which was created in 2001 to promote sustainable lifestyles among youth (15-24 years) through education, dialogue, awareness raising and capacity building. The series is being produced for young people and people working with youth, such as educators, teachers, trainers and youth leaders in both developed and developing countries. The guidebook: • Considers the causes and effects of climate change and its human impacts and responses, while connecting them to lifestyle choices and the technical and social infrastructures of a society; • Provides scientific, political, economic, social, ethical and cultural perspectives on climate change; • Explains complex issues in accessible language supported by facts, graphics, images, examples and web links; • Develops the critical skills young people need to make personal choices to address the challenges of climate change.
Adapting to the profound effects of climate change, lifting one billion starving people out of hunger, addressing the escalating obesity crisis – these are just three of the many formidable economic, social and environmental challenges confronting the food system. One thing is clear: if society is going to successfully meet these challenges, something has to change – ‘business as usual is not an option’. This assessment – a key message from the 2010 report Food Justice – has gained widespread, cross-sectoral endorsement in recent years. To date, however, this growing consensus has not been translated into the transformative policy and practice that is urgently required. What, exactly, does getting beyond business as usual mean in practical terms? That is the question the Food Ethics Council’s Beyond Business As Usual project has sought to answer.
Directed by photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand and narrated by Glenn Close, HOME takes you on a visually stunning, spectacular voyage around the world. It is a unique film that approaches the current debate about climate change from a whole new angle, giving viewers the opportunity to see for themselves how our earth is changing. Going well beyond the scientific reports, charts and graphs, this film is an inspiration that speaks to our hearts and touches our souls. Spanning 54 countries and 120 locations, all seen from the air, the film captures the Earth’s most amazing landscapes, showcasing its incomparable beauty and acknowledging its vulnerability. HOME is a compelling emotional reminder of what is at stake: the Earth, in all its beauty, and the people who live on it. HOME is the first major film about climate change that has been made using only aerial photography. The film marks artist and activist, Yann Arthus-Betrand’s feature film directorial debut.
World Environment Day (WED) is the principal vehicle of the United Nations for encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the environment. Over the years it has grown to be a broad, global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated in more than 100 countries. It also serves as the ‘people’s day’ for doing something positive for the environment, galvanizing individual actions into a collective power that generates an exponential positive impact on the planet. Every Action Counts Whether it is to organize clean-up campaigns, walk-to-work days, plastic purges, art exhibits, tree-planting drives, concerts, dance recitals, switching off the lights, recycling drives, social media campaigns and different contests — every action counts. When multiplied by a global chorus, our individual voices and actions become exponential in their impact. WED 2014: Raise your voice, not the sea level In support of the UN designation of 2014 as the International Year of Small Island Developing States (SIDS), WED this year adopts SIDS in the broader context of climate change as its theme.
The paper begins by highlighting the rationale for focusing on the diets question, and then moves on to discuss definitions of ‘good nutrition’ on the one hand, and ‘sustainability’ on the other.  The main substance of the paper concerns itself with the major food groups that constitute UK’s Eatwell plate, examining the health and sustainability issues that their consumption raises, before drawing some conclusions.  A review of recent studies in this area is also included. An important limitation of the paper is that it focuses largely on developed country contexts.
Seismic events have convulsed global markets since 2008, when From Poverty to Power was first published. World news has been full of stories reflecting a profound sense of uncertainty about global futures. In response, this new edition of From Poverty to Power has been fully revised and now includes an in-depth analysis of the human impact of the global financial and food crises. From Poverty to Power, 2nd Edition argues that a radical redistribution of power, opportunities, and assets, rather than traditional models of charitable or government aid, is required to break the cycle of poverty and inequality. Active citizens and effective states are driving this transformation. Why active citizens? Because people living in poverty must have a voice in deciding their own destiny and holding the state and the private sector to account. Why effective states? Because history shows that no country has prospered without a state structure that can actively manage the development process. There is now an added urgency: climate change. We need to build a secure, fair, and sustainable world within the limits set by scarce resources and ecological realities. The book is accompanied by a list of blog resources. The From Poverty to Power blog played a key role in shaping the second edition of the book. Selected posts have now been indexed thematically to create an effective list of background material that can be read alongside the book.
World on the Edge (Free download of Book) PDF We are facing issues of near-overwhelming complexity and unprecedented urgency. Our challenge is to think globally and develop policies to counteract environmental decline and economic collapse. The question is: Can we change direction before we go over the edge? PRAISE FOR WORLD ON THE EDGE "World on the Edge is brilliant. Author Lester Brown is one of humanity's greatest voices for the environment. In this volume, he presents the reader with a clear prescription for restoring sanity to our relationship with the biosphere. Highest recommendation."—Geoffrey Holland, Author, The Hydrogen Age "This is the ultimate survival guide for our species. Lester Brown plots a path around and beyond the looming environmental abyss with courage, compassion and immense wisdom." —Jonathan Watts, Asia Environment Correspondent for The Guardian and author of When A Billion Chinese Jump "No one is better informed than Lester Brown of the multi-faceted crisis facing our planet. And no one has spelt out so clearly how our civilisation could be saved from falling 'over the edge' while there is—hopefully—still just time." —John Rowley, founder/editorwww.peopleandplanet.net "Lester Brown has produced another 'planetary survey' book that tells us how to get off the wrecking train we are on by courtesy of a dozen environmental assaults such as climate change. The better news (and there’s plenty) is that turning problems into opportunities generally puts money into our pockets." —Norman Myers, 21st Century School, University of Oxford "World on Edge details the vice closing around us: a quadruple squeeze of global warming and shortages in food, water and energy. Then it explains the path out—and how little time we have left to take that path. Got anything more important to read than that?" —Peter Goldmark, former head of the Port authority of New York and New Jersey, President of the Rockefeller Foundation, and CEO of the International Herald Tribune "The world is a much more hopeful place because of the work and life of Lester Brown. World on the Edge should be read by everyone who wants to see a better life for their children, which is just about everybody." —Ted Glick, Policy Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network "Brown understands well the precariousness of human civilization ...[and] expresses it in patient and telling detail that addresses the intelligence and humanity of the reader." —Bryan Walker on Celsias.com "[World on the Edge] manages to cover both the grand sweep of global trends and the fine detail of some of the ideas being developed in response.” —Ed Crooks, Financial Times “Reading World on the Edge brings topics ranging from crop failures to state failures together in a way that no series of blog posts could…Brown draws these connections with both scientific rigor and the patience of a committed teacher.” —Jeff McIntire-Strasburg,Sustainablog.org "It is the most interesting book I have ever read and inspires me to do something immediate to save our civilization." —Hanh Lien, translator for the Vietnamese edition ofWorld on the Edge
This discussion paper is an attempt to lay out a path toward a more sustainable society. It introduces several principles of sustainable well-being that meet the key sustainability challenges of advanced societies. Taken together, these principles form a vision of a sustainable well-being society. In addition, the paper analyzes the changing role of government in the transition towards sustainability.
Every place will have a different set of geographical, social, economic and demographic set of circumstances which means that a local approach is needed to support communities to thrive, be more sustainable, resilient and healthy in changing times and climates. NHS, public health and social care organisations play an important role in local communities, as employers, and as core public service providers. They are an integral part of communities and can help support community groups, local agencies and local people to further build a sense of place and identity so people want to live, work and invest there. These elements create the conditions for improved health and wellbeing. This area is divided into two parts that focus on: Developing local frameworks Building resilience to climate change and adverse events
Options for reducing livestock production and consumption to fit within ecological limits, with a focus in Europe. Human pressure on the planet is reaching a scale that could compromise the stability of the Earth's systems. A group of influential scientists have recently identified nine planetary boundaries related to Earth-system processes and their associated thresholds, which – if crossed – could destabilise our living environment. The main impacts of livestock production are key components in four of those boundaries – biodiversity loss, nitorgen and phosphorus cycles, land use change, and climate change – including the three already beyond acceptable levels. Ecological livestock, and more widely ecological farming, relies on the principle of ecological optimisation. Ecologically optimising agriculture systems will ultimately lead to achieving global food security while ensuring protection of ecosystem services.
The 2012 edition of the LPR highlights the tremendous pressure that humanity is putting on our planet. We are using 50 per cent more resources than the Earth can provide. By 2030, even two planets will not be enough. Our natural capital is declining and our Ecological Footprint is increasing. Urgent action is needed to ensure that we can live in harmony with nature. 7 billion expectations, one planet: Human population dynamics are a major driving force behind environmental degradation. One aspect of this is the overall size of the global population, which has more than doubled since 1950 - to 7 billion in 2011 and is forecast to reach just over 9.3 billion people by 2050. Rising consumption trends in high-income groups around the world and in BRIICS countries, combined with growing population numbers, provide warning signs of the potential for even larger footprints in the future. We can create more just and equitable societies - providing food, water and energy for all - through the sustainable management of the Earth’s natural capital.
A healthy planet is our life-support system. Not only does it give us food, but also clean air, a stable climate and fresh water. Yet the natural world we depend on is in crisis, its ability to sustain life is under threat. But we can change things for the better. What's the problem? Our planet is our life-support system providing us with all we need to survive. Yet human activity is wrecking it - which in turn affects its ability to support us. In our free booklet we explain why a healthy planet matters to our existence and what nature's systems do for us. 
Friends of the Earth wants a healthy planet and a good life for everyone on it. You might wonder what the economy has to do with this. Here’s how it links up. The economy should provide us with the basics for a good life. But we can’t have a good life without a healthy planet and the food, clean air and fresh it gives us. If our economy damages the environment, our quality of life is affected.
There’s no getting around it: The foods we eat have a huge environmental impact and they contribute to global warming. That’s why a lot of people who are concerned about recent weather extremes and climate change are now paying closer attention to their dietary choices. It’s not just what kind of car you drive (if you drive one), or how well you conserve energy (hopefully you do). It’s also which foods you eat. And earth-smart eating tastes great!
How can we forge a fairer and more equal society to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century? Why do fairness and equality matter when it comes to tackling climate change and the global financial crisis? This short paper aims to provoke fresh thinking and debate about the policies we shall need for the future. It opens up a new programme of work at nef (the new economics foundation) that explores the connections between society, economy and the environment, and draws out their implications for social policy.