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The Well-being Indicator Tool for Youth (WIT-Y) was designed for youth aged 15-21 years. It consists of: - The WIT-Y assessment, an online tool that youth can complete to explore their well-being across eight domains. - The WIT-Y Snapshot, which gives youth a picture of their well-being based on the assessment they completed. - The WIT-Y Blueprint, a planning document for youth to use after looking at their WIT-Y Snapshot. The Blueprint helps youth take steps to increase their well-being in a particular area.
The UK Prosperity Index assesses how prosperous a place is using a combination of wealth and wellbeing across a number of sub-indices. From the strength of communities to the health of the population, the Index goes beyond traditional measures to give a rich picture of life in the UK.
Since the financial crisis, there has been an increased interest in moving away from GDP and wealth as measures of national and individual performance. Instead, more explicit attention is being paid to wellbeing around the world, and how it can be promoted at individual, local, national and international levels. This free online course will help you engage constructively in the wellbeing movement, and use wellbeing considerations to make important transformations to your work and your ways of planning, learning and justifying your decisions.
This report presents findings from the 2015 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey. It explores levels of social capital in Scotland by addressing a number of key questions: • How connected are people to their local area and to what extent do people belong to social networks? • Which groups are more likely to feel they belong to their local area and have strong social networks? • What is the strength of the relationship between place and levels of social capital? • Are people engaging in civic activities or volunteering and do they believe that things can change in their local area? • Are people in Scotland supportive of the idea of co-production?
Happiness has a pulse – Complete this short survey and in just a few minutes you can understand more about your happiness and explore simple ways to grow happiness where you are. This is part of the Happy City Index - the world’s first city-wide, comprehensive, live measure of happiness and wellbeing. It will revolutionise how cities are developed across the world.
The move to a new health system has created opportunities for public health and healthcare to become more person and community centred. Changes in commissioning and practice need to be supported by good access to evidence and practical information. This briefing gives an overview of the case for change, key concepts and types of community-centred approaches.
This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. Person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing have significant potential to improve outcomes for individuals, support the development of strong and resilient communities and, over time, help reduce demand on formal health and social care services. There is evidence from both research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing.
Eight Steps To Enabling Wellbeing If we are to continue to improve wellbeing a fundamental rethinking of the state’s relationship to citizens and communities is required. Certain areas of our wellbeing can be best improved through our interactions with friends and family and through community activity. The state should continue providing the public services that it excels at but it must also take on a new role that of the ‘Enabling State’ empowering and supporting communities, individuals and families to play a more active role in improving their own wellbeing.. In this Carnegie UK report, Sir John Elvidge presents the concept of the Enabling State and sets out eight steps that governments can take to improve the wellbeing of all sections of our society, to support individuals and communities to achieve positive change and ensure that the most vulnerable people are not left behind.
Research has shown that the amount and quality of social connections with people around us are vitally important to an individual’s well-being and should be considered when making any assessment of National Well-being.This article focuses on people’s relationships with both family and friends. However, these relationships do not operate in isolation, and relationships within the wider community and the workplace are also analysed. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. A Report Chris Randall, Office for National Statistics.
In her New Orleans neighbourhood, artist and TED Fellow Candy Chang turned an abandoned house into a giant chalkboard asking a fill-in-the-blank question: “Before I die I want to ___.” Her neighbours' answers — surprising, poignant, funny — became an unexpected mirror for the community. The project shows how public spaces can be transformed to allow communities to have a voice and share more with one another, reflecting what is important to us and helping us lead better lives.
Community Matters conducted a two year investigation involving our members and the Institute for Voluntary Action Research (IVAR) to understand and explain the contribution of community-based multipurpose voluntary organisations to maintaining and building good levels of formal and informal political participation in otherwise deprived areas. This report looks at the research and how our members contribute to that local culture of connectedness, social action, and political self-confidence.
This guide describes the Community Potluck events that have been hosted by Network of Wellbeing, in Totnes (UK). The aim of this document is to offer information and inspiration to help you to run similar activity in your own community. Considering the “Five ways to Wellbeing” developed by nef (new economics foundation), this event offers an opportunity for people to connect by meeting new people in their own community, learn a bit more about each other and about the concept of wellbeing by exploring the theme over conversations, give contributions towards the meal as well as potentially also offering time to help organise the event, be active by going to a new place to do something different and take notice of what their own community has to offer. So check out this informative guide, and find out how you could create a Community Potluck in your own area!
The Sustainable Development Alliance includes 28 Welsh charities, social enterprises and community groups whose work supports people and nature to thrive. We all work on different issues, but we’re speaking with one voice about why we think the Well-being of Future Generations is so important and how it can help futures generation of our families lead healthy, happy and safe lives. In this report we have a look at some of the ways in which we think Wales can get better through a strong Well-being of Future Generations Bill. An effective Bill could help reduce our emissions of greenhouse gases, help people out of poverty, create and sustain meaningful employment and use our purchasing power for good – all would have a huge benefit on people and the planet in Wales and across the world. These are just some examples of the sorts of things we think public bodies should be doing together to ensure that future generations can live well in Wales.
Since 2010 the government has made great strides in measuring population wellbeing. The question now is how to use that data and other evidence on wellbeing to create better policies. This project brought together members of the public to help do just that. By running three public dialogues on wellbeing in policy, this project found that the public were interested and engaged with wellbeing, and that the wellbeing lens enabled them to really consider what matters to them. This has the potential, not only to deliver better policy, but also to reconnect people to the policy-making process in a meaningful way. The project aims to answer the question: When and how should the public be engaged in the use of wellbeing in policy-making? It then looks at three policy areas and provides guidance and support for policy makers. The three areas are: - Increasing the incomes of low earners; - Reducing loneliness; - Increasing community control through community rights.
Much of the writing on a post-growth world is about economics. In this exciting and ground-breaking short essay Andrew Dobson considers the implications of the end of growth for politics. Dobson, Professor of Politics at Keele University argues that if the end of growth is to be planned, rather than unplanned and catastrophic, we need now to get onto a trajectory for a benign post-growth world. And that trajectory has six crucial pre-conditions: equality, democracy, a vibrant public sphere, localisation, feminism and the idea and practice of enough.
At the Arts Council, when they talk about the value of arts and culture to society, they always start with its intrinsic value: how arts and culture can illuminate our inner lives and enrich our emotional world. This is what they cherish. They also understand that arts and culture has a wider, more measurable impact on our economy, health and wellbeing, society and education. It’s important we also recognize this impact to help people think of our arts and culture for what they are: a strategic national resource. The value of arts and culture to people and society – an evidence review, gathers information that shows where the impact of their work is felt, whilst also identifying any gaps to help shape future research commissions.
In Transition 2.0 is an inspirational immersion in the Transition movement, gathering stories from around the world of ordinary people doing extraordinary things. You'll hear about communities printing their own money, growing food, localising their economies and setting up community power stations. It's an idea that has gone viral, a social experiment that is about responding to uncertain times with solutions and optimism. In a world of increasing uncertainty, here is a story of hope, ingenuity and the power of growing vegetables in unexpected places.
Totnes and District is feeling the effects of the economic downturn, along with the rest of the country. Climate change impacts and rising energy costs are further signs that the assumptions underpinning our current economic system need urgent review. Here we have an unusually independent economy. Rather than sacrifice that by pursuing growth at any cost, here we suggest that protecting and enhancing this economy is where our future lies. But how will this provide the jobs we all need to survive? This report identifies a multi-million pound opportunity to create new jobs, grow new enterprises and help existing businesses to thrive. It’s people-based, community-led, sustainable economic development that provides new livelihoods. At the same time, it helps ensure we can feed ourselves, minimise our fuel bills and carbon emissions,provide safer refuge for our savings and pensions and take care of those most in need. This work brings together a coalition of local stakeholder organisations, anchored here in our community, to develop an economic approach designed specifically for Totnes and District (T&D), and shows that we can unite to deliver real change.
It’s often said that it’s better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? While many of us feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others, or say we’ll focus on doing good deeds when we have more ‘spare time’, evidence shows that helping others is actually beneficial for your own mental health and wellbeing. It can help reduce stress, improve your emotional wellbeing and even benefit your physical health. As part of the work to help the nation lead mentally healthy lives, Mental Health Foundation have produced this pocket guide to show the positive impact that helping others can have on your own mental health, including some tips and suggestions to help you get started and a diary to keep track of how you’re getting on.
Over three and a half years, the Well London programme empowered some of the capital’s most deprived communities to take a proactive role in enhancing their health and wellbeing. Within this programme, there were a number of strands of work with Be Creative Be Well representing the importance of art and creativity in health agendas. This report is an independent evaluation of Be Creative Be Well, looking at the impact that the quality of the arts and cultural activity can have in community engagement and in improving health and wellbeing.
Thrive is a national charity that uses gardening to change lives. We champion the benefits of gardening, carry out research and offer training and practical solutions so that anyone with a disability can take part in, benefit from and enjoy gardening. The Growing 4 Life project was set up with the support of Ecominds and the Big Lottery to work with older people with mental health support needs, using the therapeutic powers of gardening to help people regain confidence, build self esteem and motivation as well as creating new social networks. Through participation in the project people will have a direct impact on their local environment by creating better local green spaces. The project also looked at creating an environment where participants felt able to continue working in the green space as part of a self support peer group. The learning outcomes and evidence gained through delivery of this project has been used to produce this free resource guide to setting up a community garden project for people affected by mental ill-health.
This report provides an overview of this programme. The aim is to explore the intersection of community level initiatives and the development of a sustainable economy. In particular, it was believed that Scotland has developed some of the principles and practices of community based ownership of resources over the recent and distant past, and that this legacy could provide a model for how a more equitable, resilient, low carbon economy could be achieved in the future. Even if such an economy does not emerge, communities need to be strengthened so that they can support the needs of their members, especially if the contribution of governments is diminished. Whilst the Programme explored issues within Scotland in particular, many of the findings are also broadly relevant for other countries, and we drew on international examples as required. The goals of this Programme were to explore and design models for community resourcing, identify barriers for effective action in this area and highlight opportunities for future action. The planned output was the development of practical recommendations for the short, medium and long term, building on the combined knowledge of programme participants. The programme sought these goals through a series of interlinked seminars and also developed relationships between academics, practitioners and policy makers who are involved in various ways in this intellectual and practical space.
This report provides an overview of the GLADS project, the main messages that came out of it and the key conclusions. The main purpose of the report is to work as a general record of the Good Lives and Decent Societies (GLADS) seminar series, not as a summary of each and every presentation. It has been written to give a flavour of the events, not a blow-by-blow account. It is principally aimed at a policy and practice audience, and more generally for anyone interested in the wellbeing debate. GLADS was designed to stimulate multi-disciplinary collaboration between academics, policy makers and practitioners. It aimed to increase understanding, facilitate the sharing of learning and generate new insights into how to embed the multi-faceted notion of societal wellbeing and social progress into decision-making to enable everyone to live a good live in a decent society.
This report presents compelling evidence that we as a nation, and especially our children, are exhibiting the symptoms of a modern phenomenon known as ‘Nature Deficit Disorder’. We look at what this disorder is costing us, why it’s proving so difficult to reverse, and gather current thinking on what we must do to eliminate it, before opening up the question to the nation for consideration. It is important to state from the beginning that this is not an anachronistic lament on modernity. The benefits of modern technology are many; and to cry out for the return of some mythical golden age would be as ineffective as it would be misguided. Instead, this report is a call to arms to ensure that as we move forward, we do so while retaining what is most precious and gives life most meaning. As Octavia Hill, one of the founders of the National Trust, observed over 100 years ago, ‘the sight of sky and things growing are fundamental needs, common to all men.’ The lengthening shadow of what has been termed Nature Deficit Disorder threatens the fulfilment of that need; we must turn the tide.
This briefing paper presents key findings and policy recommendations from the data collected in the Wellbeing & Poverty Pathways field research undertaken in Chiawa, Zambia between 2010 and 2012. Key findings include: • Livelihoods in struggle: The people of Chiawa are struggling to survive, with traditional farming methods under threat and few secure alternative opportunities • Resource conflicts: Key concerns relate to the destruction of crops by wildlife, land alienation to outside investors, the elite capture of development interventions and local people's exclusion from decision-making. • Wellbeing: The multi-dimensional model of 'inner wellbeing' shows people in Chiawa to have low economic confidence, little sense of agency and low social trust. The research also demonstrates that local understandings of wellbeing extend into an ethic of taking care of others across time and space, and this should be seen as a model of power well used.
This guide introduces the 2010 Gross National Happiness (GNH) Index of Bhutan. It explains the origins of the concept of GNH, its grounding in Bhutanese culture and history, and describes how the concept is being operationalized in the form of the GNH Index in some novel and innovative ways. Any discussion of the GNH in Bhutan must begin from the understanding that it is distinct from the western literature on ‘happiness’ in two ways. First it is multidimensional –not focused only on subjective well-being to the exclusion of other dimensions – and second, it internalizes other regarding motivations. While multidimensional measures of the quality of life and well-being are increasingly discussed, Bhutan is innovative in constructing a multidimensional measure which is itself relevant for policy and is also directly associated with a linked set of policy and programme screening tools. This guide presents the GNH Index which provides an overview of national GNH across 9 domains, comprising of 33 clustered indicators, each one of which is composed of several variables. When unpacked, the 33 clustered indicators have 124 variables.
This resource guide aims to support employers and employees to access information on improving health and wellbeing at work. Putting in place an effective workplace health programme that meets the needs of each business requires access to effective tools and information, which will help assess the needs of employees and assist with developing and implementing plans. This guide uses the World Health Organization (WHO) model as the basis for developing a workplace health programme. The WHO model involves eight stages and four aspects of the working environment. Included in the guide are information and contact details for organisations in Northern Ireland that can provide information and support to businesses on each of these aspects. The guide also includes case studies on local businesses that implemented a workplace health programme and a sample health and wellbeing action plan.
This report examines what the collaborative economy is, who is operating and participating in it, and looks at how it can be supported and managed. The collaborative economy involves using internet technologies to connect distributed groups of people make better use of goods, skills and other useful things. It is going through a period of growth and experimentation and in order to gauge where the collaborative economy is headed, we need to start by getting a better grasp of its current state.
Chaired by former minister for mental health, Paul Burstow MP, the CentreForum Mental Health Commission concludes its 12 month study on the state of wellbeing in England by identifying five key priorities between now and 2020. The Commission's final report titled 'The pursuit of happiness' calls on policymakers to: • Establish the mental wellbeing of the nation or the “pursuit of happiness” as a clear and measurable goal of government. • Roll out a National Wellbeing Programme to promote mutual support, self-care and recovery, and reduce the crippling stigma that too often goes hand in hand with mental ill health. • Prioritise investment in the mental health of children and young people right from conception. • Make places of work mental health friendly with government leading the way as an employer. • Better equip primary care to identify and treat mental health problems, closing the treatment gap that leaves one in four of the adult population needlessly suffering from depression and anxiety and 1-2% experiencing a severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The report also calls for parity of funding for mental health which currently receives 13% of NHS spend in England but accounts for 23% of demand. It is estimated that £13 billion is overspent every year on dealing with the physical health consequences of this unmet need.
This briefing paper introduces the approach to wellbeing assessment being developed and applied by Wellbeing and Poverty Pathways in its three-year research project in Zambia and India. This is a revised and updated version (original April 2011). Key elements of the approach are: • A multi-dimensional model of wellbeing: Wellbeing is made up of seven domains that span material, relational and personal factors • A new concept of Inner Wellbeing: Subjective perspectives focus on 'Inner Wellbeing': what people feel and think they can do and be • An integrated, mixed method approach: Measures of how people are doing objectively complement Inner Wellbeing assessment. Qualitative data and reflection balance quantitative measures and analysis