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Want to run a public dialogue yourself? What Works Wellbeing have produced a toolkit to help you scope and deliver a wellbeing public dialogue process. The toolkit addresses the following questions: What is a public dialogue? What does it involve? What is unique about a wellbeing dialogue? When to use public dialogues and why? How to run them and who you can get to run them for you.
Life patterns are constantly changing and evolving. In his TED Talk, Dan Thurmon explores how those patterns can be transcended by living off balance on purpose. Dan's philosophy can be summarized by the title of his book, Off Balance On Purpose. He believes that we will never achieve "perfect balance" and should, instead, learn to embrace uncertainty and initiate positive changes that lead to growth. Also, we should go beyond the pursuit of "success" and enhance our life experiences and professional endeavors with purposeful, positive contributions.
At the Arts Council, when they talk about the value of arts and culture to society, they always start with its intrinsic value: how arts and culture can illuminate our inner lives and enrich our emotional world. This is what they cherish. They also understand that arts and culture has a wider, more measurable impact on our economy, health and wellbeing, society and education. It’s important we also recognize this impact to help people think of our arts and culture for what they are: a strategic national resource. The value of arts and culture to people and society – an evidence review, gathers information that shows where the impact of their work is felt, whilst also identifying any gaps to help shape future research commissions.
The evidence in this whitepaper report has been drawn from three distinct perspectives: academic research, research by consultancies and organisational case studies. There are small case study vignettes in the main body of the report, but more detailed case studies for each of these are available on this website. This paper sets out the evidence for the linkage between employee engagement and wellbeing, and the consequential impact on individual and organisational performance. Engage for Success started to investigate the importance of the links between engagement and wellbeing because of a groundswell of requests for us to examine this rich subject area. This report is written for an audience of chief executives and HR directors as well as wellbeing and employee engagement specialists – whether they may work in-house or as external consultants. That said, we hope this will be a useful paper for all managers and leaders, regardless of whether they work in public, private or not-for-profit sectors, and regardless of organisational size.
Shaping our Age was a three year research and development project supported by the Big Lottery Research Programme and a unique partnership between Royal Voluntary Service, the Centre for Citizen Participation at Brunel University and the Centre for Social Action at De Montfort University. The project aimed to connect and interweave two key concerns: improving older people’s well-being and increasing their involvement while providing new insights into emerging issues around ageing by: - Exploring how older people understand and define their well-being - Selecting five WRVS services to participate in action and development projects - Developing participatory ways through local activities in which older people could help each other to achieve well-being - Providing the learning that could help to enable and support older people to improve their and other people’s well-being
Assembles ideas and case study material that demonstrates connections between community cultural development and government 'wellbeing' initiatives. Australian and overseas research shows that direct involvement by communities in arts activity can contribute significantly to individual and community wellbeing and can enhance the efforts of government agencies in realising their policies for community wellbeing and ecologically sustainable communities. The case studies presented here show that community-based creative processes, when embedded into an agency's policies and strategies, can be very powerful in strengthening the knowledge, engagement, social capital and leadership required to achieve policy objectives.
The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) commissioned researchers from the London School of Economics (LSE) to undertake analysis of Understanding Society data to develop the evidence base on the wellbeing impacts of cultural engagement and sport participation. This work gives us new evidence of the link between our policies and the social impacts of engagement in both sport and culture.
The Well-being at work report summarises the strongest evidence on the factors that influence well-being at work, along with possible implications for employers. It presents examples of how organisations leading the way in terms of fostering well-being at work are addressing these factors. It outlines how certain features of individuals’ working lives have varying degrees of influence over the various aspects of well-being – from increasing a sense of purpose, to promoting positive emotions, morale, motivation, overall job satisfaction and even life satisfaction. Based on statistical evidence, the report concludes that: • Getting the right work-life balance is an effective way of avoiding stress at work. • It is possible to maximise overall organisational well-being through a re-evaluation of how salaries are distributed among employees. • Organisations can adopt certain approaches towards job security that help their staff achieve higher levels of job satisfaction. • Working with employees to ensure they have a sense that their job is achievable can lead to greater job satisfaction, as well as higher levels of morale. • Management behaviour seems to be highly important, with some management styles more successful than others at strengthening well-being at work. • Creating a safe working environment and a sense of the social value of the work of the organisation, may increase employees’ feelings of job satisfaction. • Good levels of job-fit and skill-use, and opportunities to develop new skills, can create high levels of employee satisfaction. • Helping employees to take greater control over their work can lead to better performance and greater job satisfaction. • Taking steps to improve relationships at work – with a particular focus on relationships between staff and managers – and encouraging positive feelings can improve both job and life satisfaction.
Bestselling author, world leading psychologist and expert adviser on wellbeing at the highest level of international public policy, Martin Seligman appeared live in the Concert Hall on Sunday 17th Feb. According to Seligman, happiness is not the result of good genes or luck. Real, lasting happiness comes from focusing on personal strengths rather than weaknesses and working with them to improve all aspects of your life. Watch as he speaks about everything from positive emotions and relationships to the politics and economics of well-being.
This chapter summarises the work which is unfolding and evolving in South Australia lead by many different partners in the residency. Some partners had begun their work in this space prior to the Residency and recognized the engagement of Martin Seligman in South Australia as an opportunity to further their work and connect to the broader strategy. Other partners used the Residency as a vehicle to begin their work on wellbeing. All of these organizations and individuals are at different stages in their journey. Building PERMA, as an individual or an organization, is not a one-step process. It really is a journey. Those organizations that have been working in this area for several years have longer stories to tell than those that are just beginning the work. Each of these journeys is individually significant. It is the sum of all of his work that makes what is happening in South Australia truly extraordinary. This section gives form to the volume of work, the scale and type of learning and leadership that is occurring across South Australia.
This report outlines Professor Martin Seligman’s theory of wellbeing, introduces and explains the main concepts of wellbeing and discusses how South Australia could move from theory to practice to increase the wellbeing of all South Australians. This report does not provide a full academic summary, but, as with all Adelaide Thinkers in Residence reports, it is designed to capture key components and concepts of the Thinkers’s expertise (in this case Positive Psychology) and to argue the logic behind the specific and detailed recommendations for South Australia.
This Emotional Resilience Toolkit provides practical guidance in promoting the resilience of individuals and teams in companies as part of an integrated health and wellbeing programme. Created by employers for employers.
Today, we have a new body of science that shows just how many other factors are also important for well-being. That is why the OECD has for several years been attempting to redefine progress, and why in July 2011, the UN General Assembly advocated more priority for policies that promote happiness. To increase well-being, new priorities are needed for governments and communities, as well as families and business. We should all care about well-being because it helps produce other good things that we care about – happier workers generate better performance for companies; happier people have more successful families and create more harmonious communities. In this report, we look in turn at well-being in three key areas of our life that affect each one of us: work, family and community. The report is about people and not abstractions. To underline this point we use the following headings: Me and my work, Me and my family, Me and my community.