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A short animated film produced for Rochdale Council about the 5 Ways to Wellbeing. Animation company Kilogramme worked with Rochdale teenagers to explore what the 5 ways to wellbeing mean to them, using their lives and their ideas.
Ecotherapy is an intervention that improves mental and physical health and wellbeing by supporting people to be active outdoors: doing gardening, food growing or environmental work. This report provides the people who plan, commission and provide health and social care services with compelling evidence for providing ecotherapy services that can: • help people look after their mental wellbeing • support people who may be at risk of developing a mental health problem • help the recovery of people with existing mental health problems.
This report describes the outcomes of a research study conducted jointly by The Children’s Society and NEF (New Economics Foundation) which explores activities that children can do themselves that might be linked to increased feelings of well-being. The Children’s Society, which has been involved in a child-centred well-being research programme since 2005, was interested to explore the extent to which NEF's 'Five Ways to Wellbeing' framework might also be relevant to children. The research involved two components: 1. A survey of 1500 children aged 10 to 15 which asked about time spent on various activities and about levels of subjective well-being 2. Eleven focus groups with around 90 children aged eight to 15 which explored their ideas about various activities which might promote their well-being.
This guide describes the Community Potluck events that have been hosted by Network of Wellbeing, in Totnes (UK). The aim of this document is to offer information and inspiration to help you to run similar activity in your own community. Considering the “Five ways to Wellbeing” developed by nef (new economics foundation), this event offers an opportunity for people to connect by meeting new people in their own community, learn a bit more about each other and about the concept of wellbeing by exploring the theme over conversations, give contributions towards the meal as well as potentially also offering time to help organise the event, be active by going to a new place to do something different and take notice of what their own community has to offer. So check out this informative guide, and find out how you could create a Community Potluck in your own area!
Over three and a half years, the Well London programme empowered some of the capital’s most deprived communities to take a proactive role in enhancing their health and wellbeing. Within this programme, there were a number of strands of work with Be Creative Be Well representing the importance of art and creativity in health agendas. This report is an independent evaluation of Be Creative Be Well, looking at the impact that the quality of the arts and cultural activity can have in community engagement and in improving health and wellbeing.
Chaired by former minister for mental health, Paul Burstow MP, the CentreForum Mental Health Commission concludes its 12 month study on the state of wellbeing in England by identifying five key priorities between now and 2020. The Commission's final report titled 'The pursuit of happiness' calls on policymakers to: • Establish the mental wellbeing of the nation or the “pursuit of happiness” as a clear and measurable goal of government. • Roll out a National Wellbeing Programme to promote mutual support, self-care and recovery, and reduce the crippling stigma that too often goes hand in hand with mental ill health. • Prioritise investment in the mental health of children and young people right from conception. • Make places of work mental health friendly with government leading the way as an employer. • Better equip primary care to identify and treat mental health problems, closing the treatment gap that leaves one in four of the adult population needlessly suffering from depression and anxiety and 1-2% experiencing a severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The report also calls for parity of funding for mental health which currently receives 13% of NHS spend in England but accounts for 23% of demand. It is estimated that £13 billion is overspent every year on dealing with the physical health consequences of this unmet need.
Nic Marks thinks quality of life is measurable. Pioneer in the field of well-being research, he creates statistical methods to measure happiness, analyzing and interpreting the evidence so that it can be applied to such policy fields as education, sustainable development, healthcare, and economics. Founder of the Centre for Well-Being, an independent think tank at the New Economics Foundation (NEF), in London, Marks is particularly keen to promote a balance between sustainable development and quality of life. To investigate this, he devised the Happy Planet Index, a global index of human well-being and environ- mental impact. Ragnhild Bang Nes is a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Oslo) and is focused on finding out the role of the environment regarding our personal happiness and general well-being.
This report focuses on resilience; setting out the types of services, resources and infrastructure that need to be in place locally to support resilient communities, helping people to ‘feel good and function well’. It will be of interest to those who commission (or aim to influence the commissioning of) local services, those who provide services that impact on the wellbeing and resilience of their local community and those who use these services.
All local authorities hope to govern in a way that promotes well-being and tackles societal problems at their root. But with finances slashed and demand for public services swelling, struggling councils are seeing these objectives drift further and further out of reach. What can be done? A new model of public service commissioning is evolving across England that may hold the key. The word ‘crisis’ has become commonplace in local government over the last five years. Reeling from cuts of up to 30%, councils are faced with the seemingly impossible task of stretching dwindling funds ever further. But new strategies are out there. By embracing the skills, time and energy of those who know most about public services – the people who use them – and switching focus towards identifying and achieving the long-term outcomes that really matter, councils are breathing new life into the services they commission. This handbook and practical guide is the result of eight years of collaboration between the New Economics Foundation (NEF) and local authorities. It sets out a model for designing, commissioning and delivering services so that they: * focus on commissioning for ‘outcomes’, meaning the long-term changes that services and other activities achieve. * promote co-production to make services more effective and bring in new resources, by working in partnership with the people using their services * promote social value by placing social, environmental and economic outcomes at the heart of commissioning.
This document is aimed at commissioners and providers of culture and leisure services in England. It is designed to help them to: - Understand and engage more effectively and collaboratively with each other and the health and wellbeing agenda; - Introduce the structures, frameworks and outcomes relating to public health; - Contribute to health and wellbeing in their locality by engaging with the right partnerships and strategic commissioning processes and; - More convincingly demonstrate the contribution the sector can make. The document is also intended to: - Highlight to public health commissioners how culture and leisure can help to tackle unhealthy lifestyles, address the social determinants of health, offer cost effective approaches, bring creative solutions and engage communities, families and individuals in managing their wellbeing.
This booklet has been designed to support people in taking action to have a healthier and more satisfying life. The “5 ways to wellbeing” have been identified through extensive reviews of research and expert opinion as simple actions that anyone can take that will have a positive impact on surprising in these messages other than knowing that there is substantial evidence to support their value in living well and that small changes can make a big difference. This workbook guides you through the “5 ways to wellbeing” and invites you to consider that they mean for you and what action and changes you would like to make in your own life.
The widespread interest in and concern for mental and emotional wellbeing in the population poses some key questions. Beyond ensuring the availability of effective mental health care and treatment how could mental health be promoted? If the emphasis is to be on promoting wellbeing rather than treating illness or merely “coping” or “getting by” what could be said with confidence? Is there a comparable message to the “5 a day” (fruit and vegetables) for physical health which seemed to have successfully engaged with public awareness? What could people be encouraged and advised to do in order to enhance their own wellbeing that was practical, available and free?
Ecotherapy is an intervention that improves mental and physical health and wellbeing by supporting people to be active outdoors: doing gardening, food growing or environmental work. This report provides the people who plan, commission and provide health and social care services with compelling evidence for providing ecotherapy services that can: help people look after their mental wellbeing, support people who may be at risk of developing a mental health problem, help the recovery of people with existing mental health problems.
Commissioned by the Government's Foresight project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing, this report recommends five ways towards well-being. It presents the evidence and rationale between each of the five ways, drawing on a wealth of psychological literature.
This report presents the results of a scoping exercise looking at how the Five Ways to Wellbeing have been used across the UK since their launch as part of the Foresight report in October 2008.The aims of this work are twofold.1. To develop an increased understanding about the scope and potentialof the Five Ways to Wellbeing as a tool to improve population mental health and wellbeing.2. To review how the Five Ways to Wellbeing are currently being used by local and national agencies to help identify future opportunities.