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This guide introduces the 2010 Gross National Happiness (GNH) Index of Bhutan. It explains the origins of the concept of GNH, its grounding in Bhutanese culture and history, and describes how the concept is being operationalized in the form of the GNH Index in some novel and innovative ways. Any discussion of the GNH in Bhutan must begin from the understanding that it is distinct from the western literature on ‘happiness’ in two ways. First it is multidimensional –not focused only on subjective well-being to the exclusion of other dimensions – and second, it internalizes other regarding motivations. While multidimensional measures of the quality of life and well-being are increasingly discussed, Bhutan is innovative in constructing a multidimensional measure which is itself relevant for policy and is also directly associated with a linked set of policy and programme screening tools. This guide presents the GNH Index which provides an overview of national GNH across 9 domains, comprising of 33 clustered indicators, each one of which is composed of several variables. When unpacked, the 33 clustered indicators have 124 variables.
The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Wellbeing Economics is made up of politicians from all major political parties. It was set up to: • Provide a forum for discussion of wellbeing issues and public policy in Parliament; • promote enhancement of wellbeing as an important government goal; • encourage the adoption of wellbeing indicators as complimentary measures of progress to GDP; • and promote policies designed to enhance wellbeing. The group’s officers are David Lammy MP (Chair), Baroness Claire Tyler (Vice-chair), Dr Julian Huppert MP (Vice-chair), Helen Goodman MP (Treasurer) and Caroline Lucas MP (Secretary). The New Economics Foundation (NEF) acts as secretariat for the group. This report is the result of a year-long inquiry by the cross-party group of MPs exploring how wellbeing evidence can be translated into policy in four diverse areas: labour markets, planning and transport, mindfulness in health and education, and arts and culture. It calls for more focus on stable employment as opposed to economic growth, and stresses that in tough economic times it is all the more vital that we remain focussed on building a high wellbeing recovery.
The kingdom of Bhutan is honoured to offer this report as a contribution to the growing global conversation on a transformative post-2015 development agenda. The report is inspired by Bhutan’s development approach based on the philosophy of Gross National Happiness (GNH) and proposes a New Development Paradigm with societal happiness as its guiding vision. Such a holistic view of development has the potential to transform humanity’s relationship with nature, restructure our economies, change our attitudes to food and wealth, and promote caring, altruism, inclusiveness and cooperation. In the new paradigm, genuine happiness is understood to arise from a deep abiding sense of harmony with the natural world, of compassion, contentment and joy. It also acknowledges that basic needs like clean air and water, good health, decent living conditions, knowledge, peace, security and justice, meaningful relationships and other dimensions of wellbeing are essential preconditions for human beings to flourish and achieve true happiness. The new development framework presented is not intended to be dogmatic or static. Rather, Bhutan wished to contribute to the search for a genuinely different paradigm – a process that will require exploration of unorthodox approaches that challenge the fundamentals of the current paradigm in search of a better way to live and flourish on our planet. This new paradigm is envisioned to emerge and evolve through a dynamic process of global conversation, participation and constant feedback.
This second edition of How’s Life? provides an update on the most important aspects that shape people’s lives and well-being: income, jobs, housing, health, work-life balance, education, social connections, civic engagement and governance, environment, personal security and subjective well-being.
Healthy Ireland is a new Government plan, that involves every part of Irish society in improving our health and wellbeing. The wellbeing and health of the people living in our country is the most valuable resource that we have. Health is major asset for our society, and improving the health and wellbeing of the nation is a national priority for the Government. Healthy Ireland is a new national framework for action to improve the health and wellbeing of our country over the coming generation. It was published on March 28th 2013, setting out four central goals for our health and wellbeing, and clear routes and strategies to achieve these goals, in which all people and all parts of our society can participate. This framework is needed because the health and wellbeing of our country is changing, and there are many trends that are leading us toward an unhealthy and extremely costly future. Evidence and experience from around the world clearly shows that to create positive health and wellbeing change takes the involvement of the whole community, the whole of Government, all of society working in unison. A healthy Ireland; where everyone can enjoy physical and mental health and wellbeing to their full potential; where wellbeing is valued and supported at every level of society and is everyone’s responsibility. Achieving this vision will be complex, and will take place at a growing pace over the coming 10-20 years. Influencing current health trends, reversing them, and moving toward a better future will take senior government and societal commitment, will take time, planning and strong leadership, will take good systems of measurement and implementation, and will rest ultimately with supporting people to make healthy choices, day-by-day, as they go about their daily lives. Healthy Ireland’s four high-level goals will be at the heart of all actions and activities. They are: • Increasing the proportion of Irish people who are healthy at all stages of life • Reducing health inequalities • Protecting the public from threats to health and wellbeing • Creating an environment where every sector of society can play its part
Resilience is a term increasingly used in reference to an ability to withstand stress and serious challenge. It is commonly discussed in relation to how best to prepare for major upheavals and challenges such as extreme weather, terrorism or other disruptions to day-to-day life. However, for resilience to have relevance to public health it must provide a framework which enables individuals and communities to withstand challenges such as poverty, inequality, worklessness and other factors that endanger health and wellbeing. This report provides supporting information to the accompanying Concepts Series 12 Briefing Paper, Resilience for public health; supporting transformation in people and communities, exploring the concept of resilience and its application within the field of public health. The exploration took the form of a review of literature looking at existing research around what promotes resilient outcomes for individuals and communities. The theme of transformation comes through strongly; of individuals and communities being able to adapt in the face of change. For people to flourish in the face of change, support is needed from their communities and those who make decisions about their communities. The report investigates ways in which the spheres of culture, the economy, governance and infrastructure can support the transformational capacity of individuals and communities.
To improve the health of local populations requires World Class Commissioning that is relevant, sensitive and accessible. This Guide has been developed by the Royal Society for Public Health in partnership with the National Social Marketing Centre, with funding from the English Department of Health. It will assist Commissioners to make the most of the best methods of promoting health, using the latest understanding of how we can support people to make healthy choices as individuals within the social and environmental contexts in which they live. The Guide will also be of value to Providers in giving insight into the Commissioning process. “This Guide will help people do good work more efficiently and will prevent a waste of resources, I strongly recommend Primary Care Trusts should not take action without reading the Guide first.” Sir Muir Gray, Director of the National Knowledge Service
As part of a year-long commission, the 'Wellbeing and Policy' report seeks to illustrate the strengths and limitations of wellbeing analysis and provides original and authoritative guidance on the implications for public policy. It is widely agreed that GDP is an important yet insufficient measure of national success. In an attempt to broaden the scope for public policy analysis, a lot of progress has been made on developing the measurement of individual wellbeing, but a lot remains to be done on how best to apply these data to policymaking. The Commission on Wellbeing and Policy works to fill this gap and explore how wellbeing analysis can be usefully applied to policy.
Good Living cannot be improvised, it must be planned. Good Living is the style of life that enables happiness and the permanency of cultural and environmental diversity; it is harmony, equality, equity and solidarity. It is not the quest for opulence or infinite economic growth.
The proposal for a framework Law of Mother Earth is to begin a transition to a new model based on the principle of living in harmony with nature (“Living Well” – in Spanish “Vivir Bien”). The objective is not to go back to the pre-industrial era. A transition to a new model will not take place immediately but the transition does need to begin. We urgently need alternatives to the capitalist development model that destroys the environment and has caused the financial, energy and food crisis, as well as climate change and deep inequalities within and between societies. This document was drafted by Bolivia’s main social movements in November 2010. The aim of this English translation is to share the proposal and philosophy so others can use the document as they wish in their regional, national and local contexts. The document below is the full version by Bolivia’s social movements. The Bolivian Plurinational Assembly has been due to approve a shorter consensus version of this law since early 2011.
The planetary phase of history has begun, but its ultimate shape is profoundly uncertain. Will global development veer toward a world of impoverished people, cultures and nature? Or will there be a Great Transition toward a future of enriched lives, human solidarity and environmental sustainability? These questions are addressed in the path-breaking essay Great Transition: The Promise and Lure of the Times Ahead. Paul Raskin, Tellus President, is lead author of this examination of the possibilities for a sustainable and desirable world. The essay describes the historic roots, current dynamics, future perils, and alternative pathways for world development. It advances one of these paths, Great Transition, as the preferred route, identifying strategies, agents of change, and values for a new global agenda. The essay's appraisal of the current global crossroads is disquieting. Conventional development is perilous, while the reform path to a sustainable future is problematic and uncertain. Yet, it shows that a fundamental change of direction is still possible. Progressive elements of civil society, government, international organizations, and business can forge a new sustainability paradigm, an alternative vision of globalization centered on the quality of life, human solidarity, environmental resilience, and an informed and engaged citizenry.