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The Well-being Indicator Tool for Youth (WIT-Y) was designed for youth aged 15-21 years. It consists of: - The WIT-Y assessment, an online tool that youth can complete to explore their well-being across eight domains. - The WIT-Y Snapshot, which gives youth a picture of their well-being based on the assessment they completed. - The WIT-Y Blueprint, a planning document for youth to use after looking at their WIT-Y Snapshot. The Blueprint helps youth take steps to increase their well-being in a particular area.
Ecotherapy is an intervention that improves mental and physical health and wellbeing by supporting people to be active outdoors: doing gardening, food growing or environmental work. This report provides the people who plan, commission and provide health and social care services with compelling evidence for providing ecotherapy services that can: • help people look after their mental wellbeing • support people who may be at risk of developing a mental health problem • help the recovery of people with existing mental health problems.
The UK Prosperity Index assesses how prosperous a place is using a combination of wealth and wellbeing across a number of sub-indices. From the strength of communities to the health of the population, the Index goes beyond traditional measures to give a rich picture of life in the UK.
Change4Life aims to help Key Stage 1 and 2 pupils understand the benefits of eating healthily and living a more active lifestyle. It’s important that children eat well and do plenty of physical activity to build a healthy body. If they’re carrying too much fat, it can build up in their bodies over time, raising their risk of life-threatening diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease in later life. In this booklet you’ll find hints, tips and lesson ideas to challenge, engage and motivate children while they learn the importance of eating healthily and being physically active.
The annual Legatum Prosperity Index™ ranks 142 countries across eight categories: the Economy, Entrepreneurship & Opportunity; Governance; Education; Health; Safety & Security; Personal Freedom; and Social Capital.
Happiness has a pulse – Complete this short survey and in just a few minutes you can understand more about your happiness and explore simple ways to grow happiness where you are. This is part of the Happy City Index - the world’s first city-wide, comprehensive, live measure of happiness and wellbeing. It will revolutionise how cities are developed across the world.
What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.
The recent shift of public health departments from primary care trusts to local authorities in England provides scope for more joined-up action to mitigate and adapt to climate change locally. Climate change poses both a threat and an opportunity for public health. This report reviews current local strategies and actions to address climate change by public health departments and their partners. It explores barriers and opportunities for action, and identifies recommendations for local and national policy and practice.
Once, the concern about the environment and the appreciation of nature were considered to follow only after the satisfaction of our material needs (the so-called post-materialist thesis). Since the early 1980s there has been a surge in the use of phrases like ‘climate change’ and ‘global warming’. There is an increasing interest in the impact of environment and environmental attitudes on health and wellbeing. There are two pathways through which this impact can be felt: a positive effect of nature on wellbeing and a negative effect of human activities on environment like pollution.
The move to a new health system has created opportunities for public health and healthcare to become more person and community centred. Changes in commissioning and practice need to be supported by good access to evidence and practical information. This briefing gives an overview of the case for change, key concepts and types of community-centred approaches.
Participating in physical activity and experiencing nature both play an important role in positively influencing our health and wellbeing. Yet, physical activity levels have dropped dramatically, and inactivity results in 1.9 million deaths worldwide annually, roughly one in 25 of all deaths. The costs of inactivity in the UK are £8.3 billion per year, equating to £5 million for each PCT. It is also well established that exposure to natural places can lead to positive mental health outcomes, whether a view of nature from a window, being within natural places or exercising in these environments. Green space is important for mental wellbeing, and levels of interaction/engagement have been linked with longevity and decreased risk of mental ill-health across a number of countries.
This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. Person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing have significant potential to improve outcomes for individuals, support the development of strong and resilient communities and, over time, help reduce demand on formal health and social care services. There is evidence from both research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing.
The Children’s Society and the University of York research report on children’s subjective well-being 2015 reviews progress that has been made in understanding how children feel about their lives and also to consider how this understanding can be put to practical use in order to improve the lives of children in the future. Its findings follow up previous reports over the last 10 years. In an international comparison of children's happiness in 15 countries, the report concluded that children in England were unhappier with their school experience than their peers in 11 other countries.
Did you know that happier people live longer and are less likely to catch colds? Or that optimists have a 77% lower risk of heart disease than pessimists? Here are all the ways your mood affects your physical health, in one infographic.
Funded by the European Commission (EC) LIFE+ programme, LiveWell for LIFE is a ground-breaking project that not only set out to show how low carbon diets can help achieve a reduction of at least 25% in greenhouse gas emissions from the EU food supply chain but also showed how these can be healthy, nutritious and affordable. The project also aimed to influence policies and practices to ease the adoption of low-carbon diets in the EU – and in particular in our pilot countries: France, Spain and Sweden – and ultimately, to put the issue of sustainable diets on the EU policy agenda.
Life patterns are constantly changing and evolving. In his TED Talk, Dan Thurmon explores how those patterns can be transcended by living off balance on purpose. Dan's philosophy can be summarized by the title of his book, Off Balance On Purpose. He believes that we will never achieve "perfect balance" and should, instead, learn to embrace uncertainty and initiate positive changes that lead to growth. Also, we should go beyond the pursuit of "success" and enhance our life experiences and professional endeavors with purposeful, positive contributions.
What effect does meditation actually have on the body? According to ASAP Science, during meditation, brain scans show an increased level of activity in regions of the brain that help decrease anxiety and depression. There's also more activity in the region that increases pain tolerance. This short and engaging video from ASAP Science show us the science behind meditation.
Strong evidence now exists of the need to shift diets towards reduced levels of meat-eating among high consuming countries like the UK to help address climate change, promote public health and help feed the world more fairly and humanely. But understanding how to achieve this dietary behaviour change has not yet received the attention it deserves. This report intends to stimulate engagement and action towards addressing this important question. Eating Better has undertaken a review of relevant consumption patterns, trends, and people’s attitudes and behaviours. We identify ten drivers that could provide opportunities for encouraging dietary shifts. We also highlight research and policy gaps and make recommendations.
Anyone with responsibility for wellbeing at their workplace could find themselves looking at a wide range of practices from mental health support, the ergonomic setup of desks, employee safety policies or the tax implications of the cycle to work scheme. In our research, we investigated how employers are using the physical workplace to boost workforce wellbeing. We found employers were using a combination of practices to maintain wellbeing in their workplace. An effective wellbeing strategy considers four elements – individual resilience, the challenges of the job, the environment and the organisation’s culture. When these elements are considered together, employers were more likely to benefit from improved productivity and performance as well as higher employee retention and lower absence.
Geographies of Human Wellbeing explores the nature of wellbeing using indicators and online data analysed using a variety of ICT and mapping techniques. Sections in the resource cover the following: 1. What is human wellbeing? Looks at definitions of human wellbeing and the different ways it can be measured. 2. The wellbeing of women and girls Focusses on gender inequality, Millennium Development Goals. Skill development focuses on using Gapminder and reading and interpreting scatter graphs. Case study: educating rural women and girls in China 3. Population and poverty Uses India as a case study. Skill development reading and constructing population pyramids and drawing choropleth maps. 4. Disease – HIV AIDS Includes reading, interpreting statistics and creating graphs from the data. Global maps to show how HIV AIDS distribution has changed over time. It also includes an extensive GIS activity based on HIV AIDS data. 5. Human wellbing student inquiry Using the inquiry process and the skill development from the previous sections, this section shows students how to undertake their own inquiry about another aspect of human wellbeing. "
At the Arts Council, when they talk about the value of arts and culture to society, they always start with its intrinsic value: how arts and culture can illuminate our inner lives and enrich our emotional world. This is what they cherish. They also understand that arts and culture has a wider, more measurable impact on our economy, health and wellbeing, society and education. It’s important we also recognize this impact to help people think of our arts and culture for what they are: a strategic national resource. The value of arts and culture to people and society – an evidence review, gathers information that shows where the impact of their work is felt, whilst also identifying any gaps to help shape future research commissions.
Connections is a practical and reflective resource for early childhood educators to guide you in supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing. It is intended for use by educators who care for children (birth to eight years) in a range of settings including Long Day Care, Family Day Care, Preschool and Out of School Hours Care. Positive mental health in early childhood is critical for children’s wellbeing and development in the present (being); and it also has important implications for their future (becoming). Children who are supported in their mental health and wellbeing in early childhood have a strong foundation for developing the skills, values and behaviours they need to experience positive physical and mental health as an adult. They are more likely to reach a higher level of education; attain and retain employment; build healthy and satisfying relationships; and participate actively in the community. This benefits both individuals and the communities in which they live. Research into supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in the early years has grown rapidly over the past 20 years. As researchers learn more about the brain and how it develops in early childhood, our understanding of how to improve long-term outcomes for children expands.
This Green Paper makes the case for a Nature and Wellbeing Act for England to halt the decline in nature and speed its recovery, for the benefit of people and our environment. We need a new legal commitment to the restoration of nature for the next generation. To achieve this ambition, we need new laws to ensure protection and enhancement of nature as an investment in our nation’s prosperity. We need to reconnect people with nature. From the local level up, the enhancement of our natural environment would be realised through local visions of how, where and why more nature can be delivered through planning and spending decisions. Nature’s recovery would bring a range of benefits, not least, for our health and wellbeing. Inactivity and obesity are escalating; poor mental health is having a significant impact on wellbeing; climate change is already affecting our urban areas and the productivity of our countryside; many of our villages, towns and cities face growing risk of flooding; and our economy continues to use many of our natural “assets” in an unsustainable way, which is likely to be a brake on progress and development in the future. The list is long.
Sleep is as important to our health as eating, drinking and breathing. It allows our bodies to repair themselves and our brains to consolidate our memories and process information. Poor sleep is linked to physical problems such as a weakened immune system and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Sleep Matters provides sound, evidence-based advice on how to improve the quality of your sleep. This includes simple ways to improve your ‘sleep hygiene’, such as adjusting the light, noise and temperature in the bedroom and changing your eating, drinking and exercise routines, advice which can also be found in Sleep Well, a handy pocket guide to better sleep. The report also includes advice on how Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can be more effective in helping people with long-term insomnia than medication, and how NHS policy could be changed to reflect this fact.
This report presents overwhelming evidence that office design significantly impacts the health, wellbeing and productivity of staff. The report finds that a range of factors – from air quality and lighting, to views of nature and interior layout – can affect the health, satisfaction and job performance of office workers. Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices – sponsored by JLL, Lend Lease and Skanska – also presents a simple toolkit that businesses can use to measure the health, wellbeing and productivity of their buildings and inform financial decision-making.
There is a growing realisation that ‘Western diets’ need to change. The rising problem of obesity in many parts of the world is well catalogued, with some suggesting that half the UK population will be obese by 2050 (if current trends continue). The strain will be felt not just on people’s waistlines, but also on the planet, on people working in the food system and on farm animal welfare. Attempts at nudging behaviours have had, at best, partial success. There has been a noticeable reluctance on the part of food companies and governments to ‘tell people what to eat’. The June 2014 meeting of the Business Forum looked at whether this needs to change – and whether stronger interventions are required, given the scale of the challenges facing humanity. Is it ethically acceptable for food businesses to try to influence people’s diets or is it unacceptable for them not to?
Totnes and District is feeling the effects of the economic downturn, along with the rest of the country. Climate change impacts and rising energy costs are further signs that the assumptions underpinning our current economic system need urgent review. Here we have an unusually independent economy. Rather than sacrifice that by pursuing growth at any cost, here we suggest that protecting and enhancing this economy is where our future lies. But how will this provide the jobs we all need to survive? This report identifies a multi-million pound opportunity to create new jobs, grow new enterprises and help existing businesses to thrive. It’s people-based, community-led, sustainable economic development that provides new livelihoods. At the same time, it helps ensure we can feed ourselves, minimise our fuel bills and carbon emissions,provide safer refuge for our savings and pensions and take care of those most in need. This work brings together a coalition of local stakeholder organisations, anchored here in our community, to develop an economic approach designed specifically for Totnes and District (T&D), and shows that we can unite to deliver real change.