Resources Database - Tag Filter Results

Glen Crust gives an engaging presentation which proposes that university might be a tool you can use more effectively when you know how it works. University life enables you to do what you love with like-minded and motivated friends, and can fulfil many aspects of wellbeing. Glen looks at how a student experience that is happy, connected, satisfying and worthwhile can be a road to fulfilling, worthwhile employment.
What effect does meditation actually have on the body? According to ASAP Science, during meditation, brain scans show an increased level of activity in regions of the brain that help decrease anxiety and depression. There's also more activity in the region that increases pain tolerance. This short and engaging video from ASAP Science show us the science behind meditation.
This report describes the outcomes of a research study conducted jointly by The Children’s Society and NEF (New Economics Foundation) which explores activities that children can do themselves that might be linked to increased feelings of well-being. The Children’s Society, which has been involved in a child-centred well-being research programme since 2005, was interested to explore the extent to which NEF's 'Five Ways to Wellbeing' framework might also be relevant to children. The research involved two components: 1. A survey of 1500 children aged 10 to 15 which asked about time spent on various activities and about levels of subjective well-being 2. Eleven focus groups with around 90 children aged eight to 15 which explored their ideas about various activities which might promote their well-being.
‘Parents want their children to be happy and positive about the future. But at times, the huge range of advice from parenting manuals, friends, family and other places can be overwhelming. ‘What make this guide different is that it’s influenced by the people that really know what they’re talking about – children themselves. It’s based on interviews with thousands of children about what makes them happy with their lives. ‘And the good news is that most of it is very straightforward. It’s about taking time to talk – and listen – to our children, showing them warmth, keeping them active and learning, letting them hang out with friends and explore their local environment.’
Climate Change and Lifestyles is the first in a series of guidebooks supporting the UNESCO/ UNEP YouthXchange (YXC) Initiative, which was created in 2001 to promote sustainable lifestyles among youth (15-24 years) through education, dialogue, awareness raising and capacity building. The series is being produced for young people and people working with youth, such as educators, teachers, trainers and youth leaders in both developed and developing countries. The guidebook: • Considers the causes and effects of climate change and its human impacts and responses, while connecting them to lifestyle choices and the technical and social infrastructures of a society; • Provides scientific, political, economic, social, ethical and cultural perspectives on climate change; • Explains complex issues in accessible language supported by facts, graphics, images, examples and web links; • Develops the critical skills young people need to make personal choices to address the challenges of climate change.
The Forbidden Education (Spanish: La Educación Prohibida) is an independent documentary released in 2012. The film documents diverse alternative education practices and unconventional schools in Latin America and Spain and includes educational approaches such as popular education, Montessori, progressive education, Waldorf, homeschooling. 
Children’s well-being is a key dimension of sustainable development and social resilience; it is about our present and our future. It requires recognition as a central building block of the European policy agenda. In Europe we do not invest enough in our children. The European Union does not have a children’s policy- nor do many countries. Children have weak or no political representation and most countries and institutions do not offer children and young people the opportunity to have their voice heard and participate in decision-making. Children and youth are particularly hard hit by the financial insecurities in present day Europe – their future is at stake. But we should not continue as in the past and we do not need more of the same. Most societies are not creative and daring enough in affecting changes for the well-being of children. We require a vibrant debate on what childhood means at the beginning of the 21st century. We need to radically shift our mindsets and transform how we think about children, learning, health, education and society. We are advocating for a paradigm shift that will: - Consider children as competent partners, nurturing personal responsibility more than compliance - Understand learning not only as a cognitive, but as an integral process with many dimensions. - Move from disease and treatment centred healthcare to promoting health and well-being. - Move from standardized education to child centred education. - Move from sectoral to systemic solutions in policy and society. There is no policy maker that does not underscore the sentenced “children are our future – we must invest in them”. Yet the action that is needed rarely follows, despite the negative economic and social consequences for individuals, communities and society at large.
Prime Minister Jyrki Katainen’s Government Report on the Future explores Finland’s long-term future challenges and opportunities, as well as outlines the Government’s common vision of the future we are seeking to build. The report homes in on the keys to sustainable growth that will secure wellbeing in the period up to 2030. It also focuses on the leading edge of new activities which require attention now and in the future. The Government Report on the Future focusing on well-being based on sustainable growth includes decisions in principle, based on which concrete steps can be taken in various areas of society.
Big Ideas for the Future is a new report from Research Councils UK (RCUK) and Universities UK that explores the excellent research taking place in UK higher education at the moment and what it will mean for us in 20 years time. It features research from all fields including science, engineering, social sciences, medicine and the arts and humanities, and is supported by personalities including Lord Karan Bilimoria, Professor Lord Robert Winston, Dr Alice Roberts and Professor Iain Stewart. Big Ideas for the Future demonstrates the value of public investment in higher education and research and the positive impact this has on economic growth and the social wellbeing of the UK.