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All local authorities hope to govern in a way that promotes well-being and tackles societal problems at their root. But with finances slashed and demand for public services swelling, struggling councils are seeing these objectives drift further and further out of reach. What can be done? A new model of public service commissioning is evolving across England that may hold the key. The word ‘crisis’ has become commonplace in local government over the last five years. Reeling from cuts of up to 30%, councils are faced with the seemingly impossible task of stretching dwindling funds ever further. But new strategies are out there. By embracing the skills, time and energy of those who know most about public services – the people who use them – and switching focus towards identifying and achieving the long-term outcomes that really matter, councils are breathing new life into the services they commission. This handbook and practical guide is the result of eight years of collaboration between the New Economics Foundation (NEF) and local authorities. It sets out a model for designing, commissioning and delivering services so that they: * focus on commissioning for ‘outcomes’, meaning the long-term changes that services and other activities achieve. * promote co-production to make services more effective and bring in new resources, by working in partnership with the people using their services * promote social value by placing social, environmental and economic outcomes at the heart of commissioning.
The American food system rests on an unstable foundation of massive fossil fuel inputs. It must be reinvented in the face of declining fuel stocks. The new food system will use less energy, and the energy it uses will come from renewable sources. We can begin the transition to the new system immediately through a process of planned, graduated, rapid change. The unplanned alternative-reconstruction from scratch after collapse-would be chaotic and tragic. The seeds of the new food system have already been planted. America's farmers have been reducing their energy use for decades. They are using less fertilizer and pesticide. The number of organic farms, farmers' markets, and CSA operations is growing rapidly. More people are thinking about where their food comes from. These are important building blocks, but much remains to be done. Our new food system will require more farmers, smaller and more diversified farms, less processed and packaged food, and less long-distance hauling of food. Governments, communities, businesses, and families each have important parts to play in reinventing a food system that functions with limited renewable energy resources to feed our population for the long term.
Planning sustainable cities for community food growing, a guide to using planning policy to meet strategic objectives through community food growing, is published today by Sustain, the alliance for better food and farming. The guide brings together, for the first time in one place, examples of planning policies around the UK that support community food growing and inspiring examples of local community gardens. It is aimed primarily at planning authorities to help them use food growing as a way of improving people’s health and mental wellbeing, transforming derelict sites and creating green spaces for people and wildlife to thrive. It follows the government’s recent Planning Practice Guidance for the National Planning Policy Framework in England, which requires planners to support the provision of space for food growing as part of building a healthy community - a principle that is relevant across the whole of the UK. Dr Hugh Ellis, Town and Country Planning Association, who wrote the foreword for the report, said: “Truly sustainable development can deliver multiple benefits such as social housing, zero carbon design, sustainable transport and local food sourcing, and this report puts community food growing into this mix, showing how more planning authorities could easily be following suit and making this standard practice in their plan making and decision taking.” The report highlights the range of strategic objectives that community food growing contributes to and illustrates this with examples of planning policies and decisions, and projects, to show why and how to provide more food growing spaces.
Over the past decade the terms placemaking and the commons have become increasingly popular, a sign of the rising recognition about what makes our communities strong and alive. The book in your hands (or on your screen) chronicles many dimensions of this growing movement, whose impact can be measured in the numerous friendships, romances, business ventures, community initiatives, and other human connections that arise each day in public places around the globe. Yet the ultimate goal of placemaking and the commons is even more elemental: to expand the possibilities for happiness in everyone’s world.
The findings from a national summit exploring how organisations can start to positively use the new arrangements for public health and commissioning are now available. Discussions at the colloquium, bringing together leaders in environmental health, NHS, public health, social services, and general practice, focused on the neccessary components of a new co-production model for public health, addressing the questions: • How to exploit the opportunities created by the integration of public health and local government? • How to maximise the new structures, approaches and democratic accountabilities to deliver public health outcomes and a reduction in inequalities?
This document is aimed at commissioners and providers of culture and leisure services in England. It is designed to help them to: - Understand and engage more effectively and collaboratively with each other and the health and wellbeing agenda; - Introduce the structures, frameworks and outcomes relating to public health; - Contribute to health and wellbeing in their locality by engaging with the right partnerships and strategic commissioning processes and; - More convincingly demonstrate the contribution the sector can make. The document is also intended to: - Highlight to public health commissioners how culture and leisure can help to tackle unhealthy lifestyles, address the social determinants of health, offer cost effective approaches, bring creative solutions and engage communities, families and individuals in managing their wellbeing.
Resilience is often understood simply as the ability to “bounce back” from a single disaster like a hurricane or earthquake. This survey commissioned by Post Carbon Institute found that leading US municipalities already have a much more sophisticated understanding of resilience involving economic, energy, and social challenges—and they're putting it into action through policies, regulations, and programs.
Organising a regional gathering can feel like a big deal. It’s true that there’s a fair amount of work involved, but it can be useful to think about it in its most basic form: a gathering is just a bunch of people spending the day together. This guide will help you get to grips with the basics!
Every place will have a different set of geographical, social, economic and demographic set of circumstances which means that a local approach is needed to support communities to thrive, be more sustainable, resilient and healthy in changing times and climates. NHS, public health and social care organisations play an important role in local communities, as employers, and as core public service providers. They are an integral part of communities and can help support community groups, local agencies and local people to further build a sense of place and identity so people want to live, work and invest there. These elements create the conditions for improved health and wellbeing. This area is divided into two parts that focus on: Developing local frameworks Building resilience to climate change and adverse events
Health and wellbeing boards are an important feature of the reforms introduced by the Health and Social Care Act 2012. All upper-tier local authorities set up shadow boards in April 2012, which became fully operational on 1 April 2013. The boards are intended to bring together bodies from the NHS, public health and local government, including Healthwatch as the patient's voice, jointly to plan how best to meet local health and care needs, and to commission services accordingly. In our previous report on health and wellbeing boards, published shortly after the shadow boards were established, we concluded that the single biggest test would be whether they could offer strong, credible and shared leadership across local organisational boundaries. One year on, expectations of what the boards should deliver have never been higher. This report examines how the boards have used their shadow year, what they have achieved, and whether they are providing effective leadership across local systems of care.
Words from the Edge is a film about the unprecedented transition that we are undergoing from a culture of industrial growth and inequality to what must inevitably be more localised, sustainable, living economies. It’s a film about what this shift involves, and what we need to do to get there. Following five ‘ordinary people’ as they look to an uncertain future and explore the steps they can take to face it…Their stories are interwoven with interviews with leaders and pioneers in the field of resilience-building. Interviews with: Rob Hopkins, Vandana Shiva, Richard Heinberg, Naomi Klein,Stephan Harding,Patrick Holden,Giorgos Kallis,Rhamis Kent, Nicole Foss.
The Community Foodie documentary has been put together to share all the amazing work that has been done across the rural areas of Bridgend, Vale of Glamorgan and Torfaen (South Wales) to bring food growing back to the heart of the communities. With the support of the Community Foodie Project local communities have turned their food growing visions into reality. Creating areas that not only offer an abundance of locally grown food but also a place for education, improvement of health and well-being, social inclusion etc... We hope that by viewing this documentary it will not only give you a flavour the great work that has been achieved by these groups but also a sense of what can be achieved within your community.
'A Glass Half-full' offers a fresh perspective on how to reduce inequalities in community health and wellbeing. It proposes assessing and building on the strengths and resources in a community to increase resilience and social capital, and develop better ways of delivering health outcomes. Mounting evidence shows that when practitioners begin with what communities have – their assets – as opposed to what they don't have - their needs - a community's ability to address those needs increases. So too does its capacity to lever in external assistance. This publication offers local authorities, health practitioners and politicians an introduction to the asset model approach and principles and gives examples of how it is being used in England. It also outlines a set of coherent and structured tools that put asset model principles into practice.
The British Academy presents a collection of opinion pieces on health inequalities from leading social scientists. Each of the authors has written an article, drawing on the evidence base for their particular area of expertise, identifying one policy intervention  that they think local authorities could introduce to improve the health of the local population and reduce health inequalities. The report seeks to help local policymakers improve the health of their communities by presenting evidence from the social sciences that can help reduce inequalities in health. With a foreword from Sir Michael Marmot, the report further explores what The Marmot Review confirmed: that socio-economic inequalities affect health outcomes and that there is a social gradient in health. In some senses this is a social sciences dialogue companion to The Marmot Review. With the current structural changes to public health in England, we hope that this report will be a useful source of information on the evidence base for local policymakers and Directors of Public Health.
The report, Community Wellbeing Indicators: Measures for Local Government, outlines key research and initiatives under the theme, and includes a 'community wellbeing indicators survey template' that can be adapted for use by local governments nationally to measure, analyse and assess the progress of community wellbeing.The aim is to demonstrate that a core set of wellbeing indicators and a menu of 'fit for purpose' indicators can provide wellbeing data to local government, and is a worthwhile and valuable investment in strengthening local government capacity and accountability.The tool contained in the research report will allow councils to measure community wellbeing using a number of standard indicators, to track changes over time, benchmark performance against results from comparative surveys in councils (QLD), and identify policy measures that can improve community outcomes.