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What if your job didn’t control your life? Brazilian CEO Ricardo Semler practices a radical form of corporate democracy, rethinking everything from board meetings to how workers report their vacation days (they don’t have to). It’s a vision that rewards the wisdom of workers, promotes work-life balance — and leads to some deep insight on what work, and life, is really all about. Bonus question: What if schools were like this too?
The aim of this guide is to promote a holistic, proactive approach to managing health and wellbeing issues at work. It also aims to encourage occupational safety and health practitioners to work with others, particularly occupational health and human resources specialists, to improve employees’ work performance and reduce sickness absence through: - identifying and addressing the causes of workplace injury and ill health, as required by health and safety law - addressing the impact of health on the capacity of employees to work, eg support those with disabilities and health conditions, and rehabilitation - promoting healthier lifestyles and therefore making a positive impact on the general health of the workforce. It’s not the intention of this guide to provide in-depth guidance or advice on specific health issues. The guide refers to UK law, statistics and examples. Readers from outside the UK who want to apply its findings should be aware of possible differences and may need to use data from theirown countries.
The report investigates the threats and opportunities for the country from climate change, focusing on the risks to infrastructure, business and public health. It also provides an update on previous analysis on flooding, and considers the current capacity in the emergency response system to handle climate extremes.
Business needs to unleash its full potential to contribute to social and environmental challenges, and to increase global well-being. A simple idea that still clashes with mainstream capitalism and its “business as usual” practices. Grounded in indigenous oriental knowledge, this paper uncovers a comprehensive holistic human-centered worldview that drives higher purpose maximization through sustainable business and management development. Taoist Yin-Yang and the Five Elements theories, along with Zen Buddhism main principles and western-based management models, provide a comprehensive framework to lead conscious businesses through value-oriented strategies. They coach a balanced relationship among corporate‘s dynamic processes putting leadership, marketing, innovation and finance at the service of a spiritual-wise business model. This is devoted exclusively to lead organizational transformation, marketing social change and render positive externalities. This paper is not only about showing that there is more to business than making money, it rather seeks to bring to the debate the personal, organisational and systemic transformational power of business when it is based in values and human-centred models that raw upon ancient human knowledge.
Workforce health plays a key role for the City of London in maintaining quality of life for its workforce and a competitive business environment. Evidence suggests that a healthy workforce is more productive and has lower turnover. The need to prioritise employee health and wellbeing is a key consideration that benefits both individuals and businesses and the wider economy. This research looks at the range of workplace health and wellbeing interventions that organisations are using to retain their competitive advantage in a challenging economic environment. It investigates the published evidence for best practice in workplace health promotion, and explores, through interviews, how this relates to the real-life experiences of large financial and professional services firms in the City. The research focuses on four areas of good practice: health promotion and wellness programmes, mental wellbeing, back pain and musculoskeletal health, and individual vs. organisational approaches.
The Well-being at work report summarises the strongest evidence on the factors that influence well-being at work, along with possible implications for employers. It presents examples of how organisations leading the way in terms of fostering well-being at work are addressing these factors. It outlines how certain features of individuals’ working lives have varying degrees of influence over the various aspects of well-being – from increasing a sense of purpose, to promoting positive emotions, morale, motivation, overall job satisfaction and even life satisfaction. Based on statistical evidence, the report concludes that: • Getting the right work-life balance is an effective way of avoiding stress at work. • It is possible to maximise overall organisational well-being through a re-evaluation of how salaries are distributed among employees. • Organisations can adopt certain approaches towards job security that help their staff achieve higher levels of job satisfaction. • Working with employees to ensure they have a sense that their job is achievable can lead to greater job satisfaction, as well as higher levels of morale. • Management behaviour seems to be highly important, with some management styles more successful than others at strengthening well-being at work. • Creating a safe working environment and a sense of the social value of the work of the organisation, may increase employees’ feelings of job satisfaction. • Good levels of job-fit and skill-use, and opportunities to develop new skills, can create high levels of employee satisfaction. • Helping employees to take greater control over their work can lead to better performance and greater job satisfaction. • Taking steps to improve relationships at work – with a particular focus on relationships between staff and managers – and encouraging positive feelings can improve both job and life satisfaction.
To improve the health of local populations requires World Class Commissioning that is relevant, sensitive and accessible. This Guide has been developed by the Royal Society for Public Health in partnership with the National Social Marketing Centre, with funding from the English Department of Health. It will assist Commissioners to make the most of the best methods of promoting health, using the latest understanding of how we can support people to make healthy choices as individuals within the social and environmental contexts in which they live. The Guide will also be of value to Providers in giving insight into the Commissioning process. “This Guide will help people do good work more efficiently and will prevent a waste of resources, I strongly recommend Primary Care Trusts should not take action without reading the Guide first.” Sir Muir Gray, Director of the National Knowledge Service
The financial crisis has lifted the veil on capitalism, exposing its inherent frailties, but there is cause for hope. There is much good work going on, with people and organizations exploring new possibilities, in search of better forms of capitalism or a new economy – towards a fairer and more sustainable world. It is also possible to see the pieces of a very interesting jigsaw coming together, bringing into focus an attractive picture of a new operating system – an so we, invite you to join us, on our journey in search of Capitalism 2.0. Through this Paper, we aim is to promote greater awareness of the issues and the possibilities; to give a sense of hope for what might be, if we make conscious choices and move towards a more sustainable economy. We achieve this by exploring the key problems inherent within our current system an then, by building on the great works going on around the world, we synthesise a range of design principles for a better system, exploring the worthy range of solutions, and how we might all work towards bringing about a better, more sustainable future. 1) Less growth, more wellbeing. 2) A broader view of what capital means. 3) Based on responsible enterprise, adding real value, where it is needed. 4) Holistic systems thinking; aligned with the circular economy. 5) Enabled by a well-functioning money system. 6) Away from speculative bubbles, towards creating longer-term real wealth. 7) Shared ownership and distribution of resources and wealth 8) Based on collaboration and striving together. 9) Founded on new institutions and greater systemic resilience.
“Imagine a workplace where people are energised and motivated by being in control of the work they do. Imagine they are trusted and given freedom, within clear guidelines, to decide how to achieve their results. Imagine they are able to get the life balance they want. Imagine they are valued according to the work they do, rather than the number of hours they spend at their desk. Wouldn’t you want to work there? Wouldn’t it also be the place that would enable you to work at your best and most productive?” The Happy Manifesto is a non-fictional guide to anyone wanting to improve their workplace, this is Happy’s open and loud call for change. We need better, and happier, workplaces. We need a new kind of management…
The aim of the Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing has been to advise the Government on how to achieve the best possible mental development and mental wellbeing for everyone in the UK in the future. The Project has used the best available scientific evidence to develop a vision for: the opportunities and challenges facing the UK over the next 20 years and beyond, and the implications for everyone’s mental development and mental wellbeing; signposts to what we all need to do to meet the challenges ahead – Government, individuals and business.