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The Well-being Indicator Tool for Youth (WIT-Y) was designed for youth aged 15-21 years. It consists of: - The WIT-Y assessment, an online tool that youth can complete to explore their well-being across eight domains. - The WIT-Y Snapshot, which gives youth a picture of their well-being based on the assessment they completed. - The WIT-Y Blueprint, a planning document for youth to use after looking at their WIT-Y Snapshot. The Blueprint helps youth take steps to increase their well-being in a particular area.
Ecotherapy is an intervention that improves mental and physical health and wellbeing by supporting people to be active outdoors: doing gardening, food growing or environmental work. This report provides the people who plan, commission and provide health and social care services with compelling evidence for providing ecotherapy services that can: • help people look after their mental wellbeing • support people who may be at risk of developing a mental health problem • help the recovery of people with existing mental health problems.
This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. Person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing have significant potential to improve outcomes for individuals, support the development of strong and resilient communities and, over time, help reduce demand on formal health and social care services. There is evidence from both research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing.
The Children’s Society and the University of York research report on children’s subjective well-being 2015 reviews progress that has been made in understanding how children feel about their lives and also to consider how this understanding can be put to practical use in order to improve the lives of children in the future. Its findings follow up previous reports over the last 10 years. In an international comparison of children's happiness in 15 countries, the report concluded that children in England were unhappier with their school experience than their peers in 11 other countries.
Research has shown that the amount and quality of social connections with people around us are vitally important to an individual’s well-being and should be considered when making any assessment of National Well-being.This article focuses on people’s relationships with both family and friends. However, these relationships do not operate in isolation, and relationships within the wider community and the workplace are also analysed. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. A Report Chris Randall, Office for National Statistics.
We have medicine cabinets for common physical injuries like cuts and colds, but no toolkits for common psychological injuries such as failure, rejection, guilt, and loss. In his inspirational talk, Guy Winch tells us that “you can’t treat a psychological wound if you don’t know you’re injured”. Guy teaches us a lesson on why it is so important to practice emotional hygiene.
The North West Healthy Living Network has completed a piece of research on how their portfolio of 19 projects has developed people's social and personal wellbeing assets. The research has created a substantial evidence base demonstrating that wellbeing projects can improve health behaviours. It also points to the importance of building wellbeing assets in order to achieve and maintain positive health and wellbeing.
Did you know that doubling your number of friends has the same effect on your well-being as a 50% increase in income? Research shows that strong social bonds are one of the most important factors to our health and happiness. See how your friendships impact your well-being in this infographic, and get tips for strengthening those relationships today!
It’s important to take care of yourself and get the most from life. This booklet suggests 10 practical ways to look after your mental health. Making simple changes to how you live doesn’t need to cost a fortune or take up loads of time. Anyone can follow this advice. Why not start today?
Connections is a practical and reflective resource for early childhood educators to guide you in supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing. It is intended for use by educators who care for children (birth to eight years) in a range of settings including Long Day Care, Family Day Care, Preschool and Out of School Hours Care. Positive mental health in early childhood is critical for children’s wellbeing and development in the present (being); and it also has important implications for their future (becoming). Children who are supported in their mental health and wellbeing in early childhood have a strong foundation for developing the skills, values and behaviours they need to experience positive physical and mental health as an adult. They are more likely to reach a higher level of education; attain and retain employment; build healthy and satisfying relationships; and participate actively in the community. This benefits both individuals and the communities in which they live. Research into supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in the early years has grown rapidly over the past 20 years. As researchers learn more about the brain and how it develops in early childhood, our understanding of how to improve long-term outcomes for children expands.
Sleep is as important to our health as eating, drinking and breathing. It allows our bodies to repair themselves and our brains to consolidate our memories and process information. Poor sleep is linked to physical problems such as a weakened immune system and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Sleep Matters provides sound, evidence-based advice on how to improve the quality of your sleep. This includes simple ways to improve your ‘sleep hygiene’, such as adjusting the light, noise and temperature in the bedroom and changing your eating, drinking and exercise routines, advice which can also be found in Sleep Well, a handy pocket guide to better sleep. The report also includes advice on how Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can be more effective in helping people with long-term insomnia than medication, and how NHS policy could be changed to reflect this fact.
It's often said that it's better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? The UK faces challenging and unstable times with volatile economic markets and job uncertainty. Many people say they feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others or say they will focus on doing good deeds when they have more ‘spare time’ but the evidence shows that helping others is beneficial forpeople’s mental health and wellbeing. It can help: - reduce stress - improve emotional wellbeing - benefit physical health - bring a sense of belonging and reduce isolation - get rid of negative feelings
Looking after your wellbeing helps you get the most out of life. Exercise and physical activity play a crucial role in how you feel about yourself and life.Whatever your age, the benefits of an active lifestyle can soon be felt. This booklet explains why exercise is important, suggests how you can get started and stay motivated.
It’s often said that it’s better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? While many of us feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others, or say we’ll focus on doing good deeds when we have more ‘spare time’, evidence shows that helping others is actually beneficial for your own mental health and wellbeing. It can help reduce stress, improve your emotional wellbeing and even benefit your physical health. As part of the work to help the nation lead mentally healthy lives, Mental Health Foundation have produced this pocket guide to show the positive impact that helping others can have on your own mental health, including some tips and suggestions to help you get started and a diary to keep track of how you’re getting on.
This information guide has been prepared by Age UK and contains general advice only, it should not be relied on as a basis for any decision or action and cannot be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. It’s never too late to think about adopting a healthier lifestyle. It doesn’t mean that you suddenly have to change your diet and start spending every day at the gym. Just a few small changes can make a big difference – making you feel better, giving you more energy and helping you to sleep more soundly. Research shows that having a positive attitude to life in general, and to getting older, can help you enjoy better health too. Choosing activities that give you an opportunity to meet people or play an active role in your local community can also help.It’s important to remember the parts of your body that are crucial to keeping active – your feet, eyes and ears. This guide highlights changes you may like to consider and the benefits they can bring.
Thrive is a national charity that uses gardening to change lives. We champion the benefits of gardening, carry out research and offer training and practical solutions so that anyone with a disability can take part in, benefit from and enjoy gardening. The Growing 4 Life project was set up with the support of Ecominds and the Big Lottery to work with older people with mental health support needs, using the therapeutic powers of gardening to help people regain confidence, build self esteem and motivation as well as creating new social networks. Through participation in the project people will have a direct impact on their local environment by creating better local green spaces. The project also looked at creating an environment where participants felt able to continue working in the green space as part of a self support peer group. The learning outcomes and evidence gained through delivery of this project has been used to produce this free resource guide to setting up a community garden project for people affected by mental ill-health.
The aim of this guide is to promote a holistic, proactive approach to managing health and wellbeing issues at work. It also aims to encourage occupational safety and health practitioners to work with others, particularly occupational health and human resources specialists, to improve employees’ work performance and reduce sickness absence through: - identifying and addressing the causes of workplace injury and ill health, as required by health and safety law - addressing the impact of health on the capacity of employees to work, eg support those with disabilities and health conditions, and rehabilitation - promoting healthier lifestyles and therefore making a positive impact on the general health of the workforce. It’s not the intention of this guide to provide in-depth guidance or advice on specific health issues. The guide refers to UK law, statistics and examples. Readers from outside the UK who want to apply its findings should be aware of possible differences and may need to use data from theirown countries.
Chaired by former minister for mental health, Paul Burstow MP, the CentreForum Mental Health Commission concludes its 12 month study on the state of wellbeing in England by identifying five key priorities between now and 2020. The Commission's final report titled 'The pursuit of happiness' calls on policymakers to: • Establish the mental wellbeing of the nation or the “pursuit of happiness” as a clear and measurable goal of government. • Roll out a National Wellbeing Programme to promote mutual support, self-care and recovery, and reduce the crippling stigma that too often goes hand in hand with mental ill health. • Prioritise investment in the mental health of children and young people right from conception. • Make places of work mental health friendly with government leading the way as an employer. • Better equip primary care to identify and treat mental health problems, closing the treatment gap that leaves one in four of the adult population needlessly suffering from depression and anxiety and 1-2% experiencing a severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The report also calls for parity of funding for mental health which currently receives 13% of NHS spend in England but accounts for 23% of demand. It is estimated that £13 billion is overspent every year on dealing with the physical health consequences of this unmet need.
It is now understood that adolescence and early adulthood is the peak age of onset for mental health problems and the period when there is a need for initial care. Poor mental health is closely related to many other health and social concerns for young people, including educational achievements, employment, relationships, and substance use. This guide has been designed to help GPs and other primary care practitioners develop practice that is young person friendly, and better identify and address the mental health needs of the young people who come to see them.
The Good Childhood Report 2014 contains new findings from the ground breaking, nine-year programme of research on children’s well-being, involving around 50,000 children. This work is carried out in collaboration with the University of York and has become the most extensive national research programme on children’s subjective well-being in the world. The objective of each report is to focus on children’s subjective well-being, drawing on the most recent evidence available for the UK, plus some comparative findings from other countries.
The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Wellbeing Economics is made up of politicians from all major political parties. It was set up to: • Provide a forum for discussion of wellbeing issues and public policy in Parliament; • promote enhancement of wellbeing as an important government goal; • encourage the adoption of wellbeing indicators as complimentary measures of progress to GDP; • and promote policies designed to enhance wellbeing. The group’s officers are David Lammy MP (Chair), Baroness Claire Tyler (Vice-chair), Dr Julian Huppert MP (Vice-chair), Helen Goodman MP (Treasurer) and Caroline Lucas MP (Secretary). The New Economics Foundation (NEF) acts as secretariat for the group. This report is the result of a year-long inquiry by the cross-party group of MPs exploring how wellbeing evidence can be translated into policy in four diverse areas: labour markets, planning and transport, mindfulness in health and education, and arts and culture. It calls for more focus on stable employment as opposed to economic growth, and stresses that in tough economic times it is all the more vital that we remain focussed on building a high wellbeing recovery.
This video presents recent work by academics in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter, drawing on the insights of ancient Greek healthcare for addressing modern problems. A central theme in this work is Galen’s idea that health consists of a ‘balance’ between six factors in our lives – food and drink, exercise and rest, sleep, our internal and external environment, and our state of mind. Healthcare, in other words, requires a ‘holistic’ approach to the management of our lives, and not just a piecemeal or formulaic approach. 
Workforce health plays a key role for the City of London in maintaining quality of life for its workforce and a competitive business environment. Evidence suggests that a healthy workforce is more productive and has lower turnover. The need to prioritise employee health and wellbeing is a key consideration that benefits both individuals and businesses and the wider economy. This research looks at the range of workplace health and wellbeing interventions that organisations are using to retain their competitive advantage in a challenging economic environment. It investigates the published evidence for best practice in workplace health promotion, and explores, through interviews, how this relates to the real-life experiences of large financial and professional services firms in the City. The research focuses on four areas of good practice: health promotion and wellness programmes, mental wellbeing, back pain and musculoskeletal health, and individual vs. organisational approaches.
We can all benefit from gardening and community food-growing projects. It is widely recognised that regular contact with plants, animals and the natural environment can improve our physical health and mental wellbeing. For the large number of people in our society – children and adults – who live with challenging physical or mental health problems, gardening and community food growing can be especially beneficial. Such activities can relieve the symptoms of serious illnesses, prevent the development of some conditions, and introduce people to a way of life that can help them to improve their well-being in the longer term. But people in a mass urbanised society like Britain don’t have easy access to land. Green space and food growing spaces need to be created and protected in the environments where we live, to make it easy for people to participate in gardening, allotments, community food growing and horticultural therapy. This is a job for local authorities and their planning departments, as well as for land owners such as housing developers. Meanwhile, action already piloted by local GPs and health authorities to ‘prescribe’ gardening and food growing to those with physical or mental health conditions should be recognised and replicated throughout the NHS. This study reviews the extensive scientific literature that exists, examining the benefits of gardening and community food growing for both physical and mental health. It presents a compelling case for action by health professionals and the NHS; local authority planners and Government planning policy specialists; and by communities themselves, to create the circumstances in which gardening and community food growing can thrive, for the benefit of everyone.
The widespread interest in and concern for mental and emotional wellbeing in the population poses some key questions. Beyond ensuring the availability of effective mental health care and treatment how could mental health be promoted? If the emphasis is to be on promoting wellbeing rather than treating illness or merely “coping” or “getting by” what could be said with confidence? Is there a comparable message to the “5 a day” (fruit and vegetables) for physical health which seemed to have successfully engaged with public awareness? What could people be encouraged and advised to do in order to enhance their own wellbeing that was practical, available and free?
As part of a year-long commission, the 'Wellbeing and Policy' report seeks to illustrate the strengths and limitations of wellbeing analysis and provides original and authoritative guidance on the implications for public policy. It is widely agreed that GDP is an important yet insufficient measure of national success. In an attempt to broaden the scope for public policy analysis, a lot of progress has been made on developing the measurement of individual wellbeing, but a lot remains to be done on how best to apply these data to policymaking. The Commission on Wellbeing and Policy works to fill this gap and explore how wellbeing analysis can be usefully applied to policy.