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Connections is a practical and reflective resource for early childhood educators to guide you in supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing. It is intended for use by educators who care for children (birth to eight years) in a range of settings including Long Day Care, Family Day Care, Preschool and Out of School Hours Care. Positive mental health in early childhood is critical for children’s wellbeing and development in the present (being); and it also has important implications for their future (becoming). Children who are supported in their mental health and wellbeing in early childhood have a strong foundation for developing the skills, values and behaviours they need to experience positive physical and mental health as an adult. They are more likely to reach a higher level of education; attain and retain employment; build healthy and satisfying relationships; and participate actively in the community. This benefits both individuals and the communities in which they live. Research into supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in the early years has grown rapidly over the past 20 years. As researchers learn more about the brain and how it develops in early childhood, our understanding of how to improve long-term outcomes for children expands.
Humanity's challenge in the 21st century is to eradicate poverty and achieve prosperity for all within the means of the planet's limited natural resources. Until recently working with Oxfam, Kate has developed a visual/conceptual tool in the shape of a doughnut -- which brings planetary boundaries together with social boundaries, creating a safe and just space between the two, in which humanity can thrive. Moving into this space demands far greater equity -- within and between countries -- in the use of natural resources, and far greater efficiency in transforming those resources to meet human needs. This talk, given on October 9th 2013 at Schumacher College, was the second of 11 talks during the autumn of 2013 on Adventures in New Economics - a wide-ranging speaker series covering the key topics in new economic thinking today, presented by Transition Town Totnes, Totnes REconomy Project, and Schumacher College.
The corporation is at a crossroads. The businesses that we have grown up with and the business models that underpin them face deep challenges. They are being reconstructed, from within and without, by pervasive technology. Their values, and the values associated with work and the workplace, are increasingly being questioned. Their model of resource use, of “use it and throw it out,” is increasingly running up against constraints of supply costs. New ways of designing and managing businesses, and new business models, are inevitable. Changes in values are always one of the biggest sources of social transformation. One of the most significant changes in values at present is the shift towards wellbeing, at both a personal and public policy level.
Totnes and District is feeling the effects of the economic downturn, along with the rest of the country. Climate change impacts and rising energy costs are further signs that the assumptions underpinning our current economic system need urgent review. Here we have an unusually independent economy. Rather than sacrifice that by pursuing growth at any cost, here we suggest that protecting and enhancing this economy is where our future lies. But how will this provide the jobs we all need to survive? This report identifies a multi-million pound opportunity to create new jobs, grow new enterprises and help existing businesses to thrive. It’s people-based, community-led, sustainable economic development that provides new livelihoods. At the same time, it helps ensure we can feed ourselves, minimise our fuel bills and carbon emissions,provide safer refuge for our savings and pensions and take care of those most in need. This work brings together a coalition of local stakeholder organisations, anchored here in our community, to develop an economic approach designed specifically for Totnes and District (T&D), and shows that we can unite to deliver real change.
Until relatively late in the 20th century, outdoor spaces around most hospitals were very much part of the healing environment. Gardens, terraces, orchards, meadows and even hospital farms were all commonplace and accessible to patients – particularly in the field of mental health. But, as time passed, the benefits for patients of being able to spend time outdoors in the fresh air have been increasingly overlooked, as the emphasis on creating a sterile environment indoors has developed. This has fostered a view that the healing environment was restricted to the inside of hospital buildings, excluding the gardens and other spaces around them. This Guide focuses on the outdoor spaces around all types of healthcare facilities. It advocates a holistic approach to their design, seeing both indoor and outdoor greenspaces as equally important for health and well-being. In doing so, it re-orientates outdoor spaces firmly within the sphere of patient-centred care – with the ‘Planetree model’ stipulating that healthcare environments should ‘foster a connection to nature and beauty’. So, all outdoor spaces should be part of the healing environment.
A movement is emerging in many places, under many guises: New Economy (or Economies), Regenerative Economy, Solidarity Economy, Next Economy, Caring Economy, Sharing Economy, Thriving Resilience, Community Resilience, Community Economics, Oppositional Economy, High Road Economy, and other names. It’s a movement to replace the default economy of excess, control, and exploitation with a new economy based on respecting biophysical constraints, preferring decentralization, and supporting mutuality. This movement is a sign of the growing recognition that what often are seen as separate movements—environment, social justice, labor, democracy, indigenous rights—are all deeply interconnected, particularly in the way that the current economic system is a root cause of much that they seek to change.
The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and high greenhouse gas emissions. The forthcoming 2013-14 World Resources Report responds to this challenge with a menu of solutions that could achieve this balance. This report provides an initial analysis of the scope of the challenge and the technical prospects of different menu items.
All local authorities hope to govern in a way that promotes well-being and tackles societal problems at their root. But with finances slashed and demand for public services swelling, struggling councils are seeing these objectives drift further and further out of reach. What can be done? A new model of public service commissioning is evolving across England that may hold the key. The word ‘crisis’ has become commonplace in local government over the last five years. Reeling from cuts of up to 30%, councils are faced with the seemingly impossible task of stretching dwindling funds ever further. But new strategies are out there. By embracing the skills, time and energy of those who know most about public services – the people who use them – and switching focus towards identifying and achieving the long-term outcomes that really matter, councils are breathing new life into the services they commission. This handbook and practical guide is the result of eight years of collaboration between the New Economics Foundation (NEF) and local authorities. It sets out a model for designing, commissioning and delivering services so that they: * focus on commissioning for ‘outcomes’, meaning the long-term changes that services and other activities achieve. * promote co-production to make services more effective and bring in new resources, by working in partnership with the people using their services * promote social value by placing social, environmental and economic outcomes at the heart of commissioning.
Our health needs as a nation are changing. Improvements in healthcare mean we are now living longer than ever, yet these advances also bring new challenges. At the same time, we are living in a society which places greater value on individual empowerment, blurring the traditional divide between professional ‘experts’ and passive service users. Patients are now recognised as experts in their own lives and conditions, with a valuable contribution to make in determining their support needs. All this is taking place against a backdrop of austerity and cuts to services, meaning that a radical rethink is required around service design and delivery. If patients are the experts on their service needs, why not engage these experts to help produce the services? Co-production of health and social services both reduces pressure on already stressed systems, while providing an increased sense of autonomy and wellbeing to the user. Commissioners and providers have a crucial role to play in promoting and funding the integration of asset-based approaches into service models so that they become the default way of working. Yet when it comes to complex needs, our research showed that many commissioners and professionals are unsure about the ability of service users to contribute to shaping the services they use, or to wider society. It is this evident gap between policy and practice that we set out to resolve.
For Middle School, High School, Individuals and Groups. This program, designed for busy people, introduces you to some of the foundational tools that Project Happiness teaches, in a time-slot that works.? These 10 short lessons are great for advisory groups, homeroom, or when you need to move the class in a positive direction. This is an effective way to enhance any SEL program. Small time commitment, big benefits.
For Middle School, High School or groups. “Circle of Happiness” is one of the fastest ways to develop more individual and classroom happiness. Students get to explore how the science of happiness ties into their own life experiences, and learn practical tools to deal with day-to-day challenges. Discussion questions amplify empathy, and inspire a new level of connection. This is a perfect way for students to learn SEL skills while empowering their happiness.
Several visions about the new development paradigm by Jacqueline McGlade, Eric Zencey, Ashok Khosla, Frances Moore-Lappé, David Suzuki, Manfred Max-Neef, Tashi Choden, John de Graaf and Kristin Vala.
Abstract: The concept of the ‘well-being of the child’ (like the ‘child’s welfare’ and ‘best interests of the child’) has remained underdetermined in legal and ethical texts on the needs and rights of children. As a hypothetical construct that draws attention to the child’s long-term welfare, the well-being of the child is a broader concept than autonomy and happiness. This paper clarifies some conceptual issues of the well-being of the child from a philosophical point of view. The main question is how well-being could in practice acquire a concrete meaning and content for a particular issue or situation. A phenomenological-hermeneutic research perspective will be outlined that allows the child’s well-being to be elucidated and specified as an anthropological and ethical idea. It is based on a contextual understanding of generative relationships, a combination of the theory and practice of making sense, here described as ‘generative insight’, which could provide ethical guidance for decision making in families, legal practice, medicine or biomedical research.