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Connections is a practical and reflective resource for early childhood educators to guide you in supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing. It is intended for use by educators who care for children (birth to eight years) in a range of settings including Long Day Care, Family Day Care, Preschool and Out of School Hours Care. Positive mental health in early childhood is critical for children’s wellbeing and development in the present (being); and it also has important implications for their future (becoming). Children who are supported in their mental health and wellbeing in early childhood have a strong foundation for developing the skills, values and behaviours they need to experience positive physical and mental health as an adult. They are more likely to reach a higher level of education; attain and retain employment; build healthy and satisfying relationships; and participate actively in the community. This benefits both individuals and the communities in which they live. Research into supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in the early years has grown rapidly over the past 20 years. As researchers learn more about the brain and how it develops in early childhood, our understanding of how to improve long-term outcomes for children expands.
The Good Childhood Report 2014 contains new findings from the ground breaking, nine-year programme of research on children’s well-being, involving around 50,000 children. This work is carried out in collaboration with the University of York and has become the most extensive national research programme on children’s subjective well-being in the world. The objective of each report is to focus on children’s subjective well-being, drawing on the most recent evidence available for the UK, plus some comparative findings from other countries.
This booklet is aimed at parents and carers of primary-aged children to help support them in talking with their child about relationships and sexual wellbeing. Everyone in Scotland should have the opportunity to have positive and respectful relationships and talking is a great place to start. Some parents/carers feel uncomfortable talking about relationships and sex with their children. Don’t worry; this booklet will help you. Thinking about the questions your child might ask you will help you prepare and make these chats less daunting.
The World Family Map Project seeks both to monitor the health of family life around the globe and to learn more about how family trends affect the well-being of children. The family is a core social institution that occupies a central place in the lives of men, women, and children around the world: It is a source of support, and sometimes an obstacle, to individual and collective achievements; a unit of economic production and consumption; an emotional haven that can sometimes be a source of emotional strain; and a vehicle for extending caregiving and culture across the generations, for better and for worse.
In 2008, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) convened the Commission to Build a Healthier America to help us find better ways to improve the health of our nation. The Commission—a national, nonpartisan group of leaders from both the public and private sectors—issued 10 sweeping recommendations aimed at improving the health of all Americans. The Commission’s work sparked a national conversation that has led to a marked increase in collaboration among a wide variety of partners aimed at addressing the many determinants of health. Eager to build upon this progress, RWJF asked the Commissioners to come together again. This year, the Commission tackled immensely complex matters that underlie profound differences in the health of Americans: experiences in early childhood; opportunities that communities provide for people to make healthy choices; and the mission and incentives of health professionals and health care institutions. They found that to improve the health of all Americans we must: 1) Invest in the foundations of lifelong physical and mental well-being in our youngest children. 2) Create communities that foster health-promoting behaviors. 3) Broaden health care to promote health outside of the medical system.
We shouldn’t underestimate the vast importance of fathers in children’s lives, not only because children ‘need and love their dads’ , but also because of the significant impact that fathers have on the social, cognitive, emotional and physical well-¬‐being of children from infancy to adolescence and with lasting influences into their adult life. This summary of evidence is based on a review of literature to parenting and children more generally, the review focused on evidence relating specifically to the influence of fathers and father figures.
Parenting and wellbeing: knitting families together argues that parenting support often fails because it ignores the wellbeing of parents themselves. The report draws on extensive national and international research, and a detailed investigation of parenting support in three very different parts of England: Hertfordshire, South Tyneside and Manchester. It recommends a range of approaches including involving parents, carers and children and young people in the design of family support. The government should establish a fund to encourage innovation in parenting support for projects aimed at all parents, not just those facing acute problems.