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Oxfam presents new evidence that the gap between rich and poor is growing ever wider and is undermining poverty eradication. This report delves into the causes of the inequality crisis and looks at the concrete solutions that can overcome it. Drawing on case studies from around the world the report demonstrates the impact that rising inequality is having on rich and poor countries alike and explores the different ways that people and governments are responding to it.
The Sustainable Development Alliance includes 28 Welsh charities, social enterprises and community groups whose work supports people and nature to thrive. We all work on different issues, but we’re speaking with one voice about why we think the Well-being of Future Generations is so important and how it can help futures generation of our families lead healthy, happy and safe lives. In this report we have a look at some of the ways in which we think Wales can get better through a strong Well-being of Future Generations Bill. An effective Bill could help reduce our emissions of greenhouse gases, help people out of poverty, create and sustain meaningful employment and use our purchasing power for good – all would have a huge benefit on people and the planet in Wales and across the world. These are just some examples of the sorts of things we think public bodies should be doing together to ensure that future generations can live well in Wales.
The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Wellbeing Economics is made up of politicians from all major political parties. It was set up to: • Provide a forum for discussion of wellbeing issues and public policy in Parliament; • promote enhancement of wellbeing as an important government goal; • encourage the adoption of wellbeing indicators as complimentary measures of progress to GDP; • and promote policies designed to enhance wellbeing. The group’s officers are David Lammy MP (Chair), Baroness Claire Tyler (Vice-chair), Dr Julian Huppert MP (Vice-chair), Helen Goodman MP (Treasurer) and Caroline Lucas MP (Secretary). The New Economics Foundation (NEF) acts as secretariat for the group. This report is the result of a year-long inquiry by the cross-party group of MPs exploring how wellbeing evidence can be translated into policy in four diverse areas: labour markets, planning and transport, mindfulness in health and education, and arts and culture. It calls for more focus on stable employment as opposed to economic growth, and stresses that in tough economic times it is all the more vital that we remain focussed on building a high wellbeing recovery.
This document is aimed at commissioners and providers of culture and leisure services in England. It is designed to help them to: - Understand and engage more effectively and collaboratively with each other and the health and wellbeing agenda; - Introduce the structures, frameworks and outcomes relating to public health; - Contribute to health and wellbeing in their locality by engaging with the right partnerships and strategic commissioning processes and; - More convincingly demonstrate the contribution the sector can make. The document is also intended to: - Highlight to public health commissioners how culture and leisure can help to tackle unhealthy lifestyles, address the social determinants of health, offer cost effective approaches, bring creative solutions and engage communities, families and individuals in managing their wellbeing.
This discussion paper is an attempt to lay out a path toward a more sustainable society. It introduces several principles of sustainable well-being that meet the key sustainability challenges of advanced societies. Taken together, these principles form a vision of a sustainable well-being society. In addition, the paper analyzes the changing role of government in the transition towards sustainability.
The report presents a global perspective on the impacts of industrial meat and dairy production, and illustrates its increasingly devastating impact on society and the environment. The way we produce and consume meat and dairy needs a radical rethink. The Meat Atlas aims to catalyse the debate over the need for better, safer and more sustainable food and farming and advocates clear individual and political solutions.
Conventional development thinking emphasises economic growth over human wellbeing and ignores care as a public good that sustains and reproduces society and on which markets depend for their functioning. Our alternative is an economic system that reflects and places a value on equitable relations between women and men. We challenge commonly held assumptions about how the economy works – assumptions that in this time of global crisis risk bringing greater misery and impoverishment for those who can least protect themselves from collapsing markets. We propose development policies and programmes that can immediately start to address the interconnected concerns of women as producers, employees and carers with positive effect for individual, family and social wellbeing. In addition, philanthropic foundations – with their track record of facilitating new an challenging ideas – can facilitate the world’s most important debate about shaping an economy for people rather than people for the economy.
Work can have a positive impact on our health and wellbeing. Healthy and well-motivated employees can have an equally positive impact on the productivity and effectiveness of a business. This booklet helps you to understand the interaction between health and wellbeing and work by focusing on: the relationships between line managers and employees the importance of getting employees involved job design, flexible working and the use of occupational health. "Managing health, work and wellbeing is the responsibility of both the employer and the employee." We also take a closer look at mental health, musculoskeletal disorders and stress. There are sample policies for managing alcohol and drug problems at Appendix 2. The booklet does not deal in detail with an employer's statutory health and safety responsibilities.
This report reveals that youngers teenagers have lower well-being than other age groups in most aspects of their lives. The findings come from our eight-year, ground-breaking programme of research, in collaboration with the University of York, to explore and measure children’s subjective well-being. This is the second in our series of annual reports to outline what we know about the quality of children’s lives – as rated by children themselves. What does the report say? So far, we have run surveys and consultations with over 42,000 children aged eight and above. 
Over the last 30 years, there has been a considerable growth in academic research on the causes of well-being. In general, this literature gives a fairly consistent picture of which factors have associations with subjective well-being. However, it is only in the last few years that there has been the corresponding level of interest from policymakers at national level. This is seen, for example, by the start of a programme of work at the UK Office for National Statistics, commissioned by the Prime Minister, on Measuring National Well-being. This document aims to provide the tools necessary to transfer this academic knowledge into a practical format for policymakers.