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It's often said that it's better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? The UK faces challenging and unstable times with volatile economic markets and job uncertainty. Many people say they feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others or say they will focus on doing good deeds when they have more ‘spare time’ but the evidence shows that helping others is beneficial forpeople’s mental health and wellbeing. It can help: - reduce stress - improve emotional wellbeing - benefit physical health - bring a sense of belonging and reduce isolation - get rid of negative feelings
It’s often said that it’s better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? While many of us feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others, or say we’ll focus on doing good deeds when we have more ‘spare time’, evidence shows that helping others is actually beneficial for your own mental health and wellbeing. It can help reduce stress, improve your emotional wellbeing and even benefit your physical health. As part of the work to help the nation lead mentally healthy lives, Mental Health Foundation have produced this pocket guide to show the positive impact that helping others can have on your own mental health, including some tips and suggestions to help you get started and a diary to keep track of how you’re getting on.
“Imagine a workplace where people are energised and motivated by being in control of the work they do. Imagine they are trusted and given freedom, within clear guidelines, to decide how to achieve their results. Imagine they are able to get the life balance they want. Imagine they are valued according to the work they do, rather than the number of hours they spend at their desk. Wouldn’t you want to work there? Wouldn’t it also be the place that would enable you to work at your best and most productive?” The Happy Manifesto is a non-fictional guide to anyone wanting to improve their workplace, this is Happy’s open and loud call for change. We need better, and happier, workplaces. We need a new kind of management…
Bestselling author, world leading psychologist and expert adviser on wellbeing at the highest level of international public policy, Martin Seligman appeared live in the Concert Hall on Sunday 17th Feb. According to Seligman, happiness is not the result of good genes or luck. Real, lasting happiness comes from focusing on personal strengths rather than weaknesses and working with them to improve all aspects of your life. Watch as he speaks about everything from positive emotions and relationships to the politics and economics of well-being.
This TED talk by Rick Hanson, Author of Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence, shows you how to tap the hidden power of everyday experiences to change your brain and your life for the better. Hardwiring Happiness shows how you can beat the brain’s negativity bias, which is like Velcro for negative experiences but Teflon for positive ones. This bias evolved to help ancient animals survive, but today it makes us feel needlessly frazzled, worried, irritated, lonely, inadequate, and blue. Instead, in just a few seconds at a time in the flow of daily life, you can turn your experiences – the pleasure in a cup of coffee, the accomplishment in finishing a tricky email, the warmth from a friend’s smile – into lasting inner strengths built into your brain, such as resilience, balance, and positive emotions. Grounded in neuroscience, Hardwiring Happiness is super practical, full of easy-to-use methods and guided practices to grow a steady well-being, self-worth, and inner peace. And it has special sections on children, motivation, relationships, trauma, and spiritual practice.
This chapter summarises the work which is unfolding and evolving in South Australia lead by many different partners in the residency. Some partners had begun their work in this space prior to the Residency and recognized the engagement of Martin Seligman in South Australia as an opportunity to further their work and connect to the broader strategy. Other partners used the Residency as a vehicle to begin their work on wellbeing. All of these organizations and individuals are at different stages in their journey. Building PERMA, as an individual or an organization, is not a one-step process. It really is a journey. Those organizations that have been working in this area for several years have longer stories to tell than those that are just beginning the work. Each of these journeys is individually significant. It is the sum of all of his work that makes what is happening in South Australia truly extraordinary. This section gives form to the volume of work, the scale and type of learning and leadership that is occurring across South Australia.
This report outlines Professor Martin Seligman’s theory of wellbeing, introduces and explains the main concepts of wellbeing and discusses how South Australia could move from theory to practice to increase the wellbeing of all South Australians. This report does not provide a full academic summary, but, as with all Adelaide Thinkers in Residence reports, it is designed to capture key components and concepts of the Thinkers’s expertise (in this case Positive Psychology) and to argue the logic behind the specific and detailed recommendations for South Australia.
This review focuses on positive aspects of wellbeing, or flourishing. It examines evidence for the causes of positive wellbeing and also its consequences, including beneficial effects for many aspects of cognitive functioning, health and social relationships. The neurological basis of psychological wellbeing is examined and recent data on brain activation and neurochemical pathways presented. Individuals vary widely in their habitual level of psychological wellbeing, and there is evidence for a seminal role of social factors and the early environment in this process. It is often assumed that the drivers of wellbeing are the same as (but in the opposite direction to) the drivers of illbeing, but while this is true for some drivers, others have more selective effects. Future developments in the science of wellbeing and its application require a fresh approach – beyond targeting the alleviation of disorder to a focus on personal and interpersonal flourishing. A universal intervention approach is outlined which may both increase population flourishing and reduce common mental health problems.