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The Well-being Indicator Tool for Youth (WIT-Y) was designed for youth aged 15-21 years. It consists of: - The WIT-Y assessment, an online tool that youth can complete to explore their well-being across eight domains. - The WIT-Y Snapshot, which gives youth a picture of their well-being based on the assessment they completed. - The WIT-Y Blueprint, a planning document for youth to use after looking at their WIT-Y Snapshot. The Blueprint helps youth take steps to increase their well-being in a particular area.
Since the financial crisis, there has been an increased interest in moving away from GDP and wealth as measures of national and individual performance. Instead, more explicit attention is being paid to wellbeing around the world, and how it can be promoted at individual, local, national and international levels. This free online course will help you engage constructively in the wellbeing movement, and use wellbeing considerations to make important transformations to your work and your ways of planning, learning and justifying your decisions.
What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.
Research has shown that the amount and quality of social connections with people around us are vitally important to an individual’s well-being and should be considered when making any assessment of National Well-being.This article focuses on people’s relationships with both family and friends. However, these relationships do not operate in isolation, and relationships within the wider community and the workplace are also analysed. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. A Report Chris Randall, Office for National Statistics.
In her New Orleans neighbourhood, artist and TED Fellow Candy Chang turned an abandoned house into a giant chalkboard asking a fill-in-the-blank question: “Before I die I want to ___.” Her neighbours' answers — surprising, poignant, funny — became an unexpected mirror for the community. The project shows how public spaces can be transformed to allow communities to have a voice and share more with one another, reflecting what is important to us and helping us lead better lives.
Life patterns are constantly changing and evolving. In his TED Talk, Dan Thurmon explores how those patterns can be transcended by living off balance on purpose. Dan's philosophy can be summarized by the title of his book, Off Balance On Purpose. He believes that we will never achieve "perfect balance" and should, instead, learn to embrace uncertainty and initiate positive changes that lead to growth. Also, we should go beyond the pursuit of "success" and enhance our life experiences and professional endeavors with purposeful, positive contributions.
Did you know that doubling your number of friends has the same effect on your well-being as a 50% increase in income? Research shows that strong social bonds are one of the most important factors to our health and happiness. See how your friendships impact your well-being in this infographic, and get tips for strengthening those relationships today!
This guide describes the Community Potluck events that have been hosted by Network of Wellbeing, in Totnes (UK). The aim of this document is to offer information and inspiration to help you to run similar activity in your own community. Considering the “Five ways to Wellbeing” developed by nef (new economics foundation), this event offers an opportunity for people to connect by meeting new people in their own community, learn a bit more about each other and about the concept of wellbeing by exploring the theme over conversations, give contributions towards the meal as well as potentially also offering time to help organise the event, be active by going to a new place to do something different and take notice of what their own community has to offer. So check out this informative guide, and find out how you could create a Community Potluck in your own area!
In November 2012 the Education for Sustainable Well-being Research Group at the University of Manitoba organized its first conference, entitled “Educating for Sustainable Well-being: Concepts, issues, perspectives, and practices”. Following the conference participants were invited to develolp their presentations into papers and submit those for consideration for inclusion in an e-book on the theme of the conference. The present book is the result of this process.
It’s often said that it’s better to give than receive but did you know that this is actually backed up by research? While many of us feel too stressed and busy to worry about helping others, or say we’ll focus on doing good deeds when we have more ‘spare time’, evidence shows that helping others is actually beneficial for your own mental health and wellbeing. It can help reduce stress, improve your emotional wellbeing and even benefit your physical health. As part of the work to help the nation lead mentally healthy lives, Mental Health Foundation have produced this pocket guide to show the positive impact that helping others can have on your own mental health, including some tips and suggestions to help you get started and a diary to keep track of how you’re getting on.
Sam Berns, age 17, was diagnosed with Progeria when he was 22 months old; a genetic disorder that results with rapid, premature aging. Progeria affects only 1 out of 4 to 8 million birhs and approximately 350 children, in the world, have this disease. His parents, both pediatricians, established The Progeria Research Foundation in 1999 to find the cause, treatment and cure. Children with Progeria live an average of 13 years. In 2013, Sam’s story was broadcasted as a documentary film with the title: Life according to Sam. His courage and spirit moved everyone who came into contact with him. Sam also shared his life philosophy at this TEDxMidAtlantic in October 2013. “No matter what I choose to become, I believe that I can change the world.” he said in his talk at TEDx. “And as I’m striving to change the world, I will be happy.”
This report presents evidence to build the case for improving the play opportunities of children and young people. Its focus is on children of school age, and on free play that takes place out of doors. It looks at quantitative evidence of the wider outcomes and impact of play interventions and initiatives. Hence it complements rather than duplicates other recent policy reviews. The report looks at four types of intervention that each involve setting aside time and space for children to play: improving opportunities for free play in school break times, unstaffed public play facilities, supervised out-of-school play provision and street play initiatives. The vast majority of relevant studies and evaluations of interventions focus on play in school. However, findings from school-based studies have wider relevance, so this report also draws wider conclusions from these findings. Playground break time initiatives are amongst the most promising interventions for improving levels of physical activity, as shown by a number of recent authoritative systematic reviews. They are also linked to a range of improvements in academic skills, attitudes and behaviour, and to improved social skills, improved social relations between different ethnic groups, and better adjustment to school life.
Shaping our Age was a three year research and development project supported by the Big Lottery Research Programme and a unique partnership between Royal Voluntary Service, the Centre for Citizen Participation at Brunel University and the Centre for Social Action at De Montfort University. The project aimed to connect and interweave two key concerns: improving older people’s well-being and increasing their involvement while providing new insights into emerging issues around ageing by: - Exploring how older people understand and define their well-being - Selecting five WRVS services to participate in action and development projects - Developing participatory ways through local activities in which older people could help each other to achieve well-being - Providing the learning that could help to enable and support older people to improve their and other people’s well-being
The research has shown that a significant minority of children in the UK have low levels of well-being. This will have severe impact on their childhood and life chances, as well as on the families and communities around them, and the agencies that support them. They also now know that policy makers can do something about this. The evidence shows that external factors play a major role in determining children’s life satisfaction and life chances. From this evidence, we have identified six priorities that promote positive well-being for children and can make a real difference to their lives. The six priorities for children’s well-being are: 1. The conditions to learn and develop 2. A positive view of themselves and an identity that is respected 3. Have enough of what matters 4. Positive relationships with family and friends 5. A safe and suitable home environment and local area 6. Opportunity to take part in positive activities to thrive
The study suggests that some environmental campaigning currently operates inadvertently to exacerbate these unhelpful aspects of identity. It also points to ways in which environmental organisations could begin to work in order to activate more helpful aspects of identity. Finally, it highlights new opportunities for collaborations across diverse civil society organisations to begin to address fundamental barriers to delivery on a range of concerns - from biodiversity loss to poverty alleviation, and racism to animal welfare abuses. 
This booklet is aimed at parents and carers of primary-aged children to help support them in talking with their child about relationships and sexual wellbeing. Everyone in Scotland should have the opportunity to have positive and respectful relationships and talking is a great place to start. Some parents/carers feel uncomfortable talking about relationships and sex with their children. Don’t worry; this booklet will help you. Thinking about the questions your child might ask you will help you prepare and make these chats less daunting.
Our health needs as a nation are changing. Improvements in healthcare mean we are now living longer than ever, yet these advances also bring new challenges. At the same time, we are living in a society which places greater value on individual empowerment, blurring the traditional divide between professional ‘experts’ and passive service users. Patients are now recognised as experts in their own lives and conditions, with a valuable contribution to make in determining their support needs. All this is taking place against a backdrop of austerity and cuts to services, meaning that a radical rethink is required around service design and delivery. If patients are the experts on their service needs, why not engage these experts to help produce the services? Co-production of health and social services both reduces pressure on already stressed systems, while providing an increased sense of autonomy and wellbeing to the user. Commissioners and providers have a crucial role to play in promoting and funding the integration of asset-based approaches into service models so that they become the default way of working. Yet when it comes to complex needs, our research showed that many commissioners and professionals are unsure about the ability of service users to contribute to shaping the services they use, or to wider society. It is this evident gap between policy and practice that we set out to resolve.
The Well-being at work report summarises the strongest evidence on the factors that influence well-being at work, along with possible implications for employers. It presents examples of how organisations leading the way in terms of fostering well-being at work are addressing these factors. It outlines how certain features of individuals’ working lives have varying degrees of influence over the various aspects of well-being – from increasing a sense of purpose, to promoting positive emotions, morale, motivation, overall job satisfaction and even life satisfaction. Based on statistical evidence, the report concludes that: • Getting the right work-life balance is an effective way of avoiding stress at work. • It is possible to maximise overall organisational well-being through a re-evaluation of how salaries are distributed among employees. • Organisations can adopt certain approaches towards job security that help their staff achieve higher levels of job satisfaction. • Working with employees to ensure they have a sense that their job is achievable can lead to greater job satisfaction, as well as higher levels of morale. • Management behaviour seems to be highly important, with some management styles more successful than others at strengthening well-being at work. • Creating a safe working environment and a sense of the social value of the work of the organisation, may increase employees’ feelings of job satisfaction. • Good levels of job-fit and skill-use, and opportunities to develop new skills, can create high levels of employee satisfaction. • Helping employees to take greater control over their work can lead to better performance and greater job satisfaction. • Taking steps to improve relationships at work – with a particular focus on relationships between staff and managers – and encouraging positive feelings can improve both job and life satisfaction.
Conventional development thinking emphasises economic growth over human wellbeing and ignores care as a public good that sustains and reproduces society and on which markets depend for their functioning. Our alternative is an economic system that reflects and places a value on equitable relations between women and men. We challenge commonly held assumptions about how the economy works – assumptions that in this time of global crisis risk bringing greater misery and impoverishment for those who can least protect themselves from collapsing markets. We propose development policies and programmes that can immediately start to address the interconnected concerns of women as producers, employees and carers with positive effect for individual, family and social wellbeing. In addition, philanthropic foundations – with their track record of facilitating new an challenging ideas – can facilitate the world’s most important debate about shaping an economy for people rather than people for the economy.
Bestselling author, world leading psychologist and expert adviser on wellbeing at the highest level of international public policy, Martin Seligman appeared live in the Concert Hall on Sunday 17th Feb. According to Seligman, happiness is not the result of good genes or luck. Real, lasting happiness comes from focusing on personal strengths rather than weaknesses and working with them to improve all aspects of your life. Watch as he speaks about everything from positive emotions and relationships to the politics and economics of well-being.
We shouldn’t underestimate the vast importance of fathers in children’s lives, not only because children ‘need and love their dads’ , but also because of the significant impact that fathers have on the social, cognitive, emotional and physical well-¬‐being of children from infancy to adolescence and with lasting influences into their adult life. This summary of evidence is based on a review of literature to parenting and children more generally, the review focused on evidence relating specifically to the influence of fathers and father figures.
Each year, the Foundation for Child Development and The Child and Youth Well-being Index Project at Duke University issue a comprehensive measure of how children are faring in the United States. The resultant National Child and Youth Wellbeing Index (CWI) is based on a composite of 28 key Indicators of Well-being, grouped into seven Quality-of-Life / Well-Being Domains. These Domains are: Family Economic Well-being, Safe/Ricky Behavior, Social Relationships, Emotional/Spiritual Well-Being, Community Engagement, Educational Attainment, and Health. This year’s report highlights: long-term trends in the CWI, in its seven Domains, and I its 28 Key Indicators, 1975-2012.
This chapter summarises the work which is unfolding and evolving in South Australia lead by many different partners in the residency. Some partners had begun their work in this space prior to the Residency and recognized the engagement of Martin Seligman in South Australia as an opportunity to further their work and connect to the broader strategy. Other partners used the Residency as a vehicle to begin their work on wellbeing. All of these organizations and individuals are at different stages in their journey. Building PERMA, as an individual or an organization, is not a one-step process. It really is a journey. Those organizations that have been working in this area for several years have longer stories to tell than those that are just beginning the work. Each of these journeys is individually significant. It is the sum of all of his work that makes what is happening in South Australia truly extraordinary. This section gives form to the volume of work, the scale and type of learning and leadership that is occurring across South Australia.
This report outlines Professor Martin Seligman’s theory of wellbeing, introduces and explains the main concepts of wellbeing and discusses how South Australia could move from theory to practice to increase the wellbeing of all South Australians. This report does not provide a full academic summary, but, as with all Adelaide Thinkers in Residence reports, it is designed to capture key components and concepts of the Thinkers’s expertise (in this case Positive Psychology) and to argue the logic behind the specific and detailed recommendations for South Australia.
Connectedness can be defined as a sense of belonging to a community, whatever that community is - your family, school, sports club or congregation. It is a feeling that you matter, that your contributions are valued and others care about you. Authentic connectedness, however, requires reciprocity. It means doing things for others as part of that group and taking the needs of your community into consideration. To do this you not only need to be able to relate well to people, you also have to believe that others in your community are worth the effort. Having a sense of belonging impacts on many aspects of individual and educational outcomes.