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Ecotherapy is an intervention that improves mental and physical health and wellbeing by supporting people to be active outdoors: doing gardening, food growing or environmental work. This report provides the people who plan, commission and provide health and social care services with compelling evidence for providing ecotherapy services that can: • help people look after their mental wellbeing • support people who may be at risk of developing a mental health problem • help the recovery of people with existing mental health problems.
Eight Steps To Enabling Wellbeing If we are to continue to improve wellbeing a fundamental rethinking of the state’s relationship to citizens and communities is required. Certain areas of our wellbeing can be best improved through our interactions with friends and family and through community activity. The state should continue providing the public services that it excels at but it must also take on a new role that of the ‘Enabling State’ empowering and supporting communities, individuals and families to play a more active role in improving their own wellbeing.. In this Carnegie UK report, Sir John Elvidge presents the concept of the Enabling State and sets out eight steps that governments can take to improve the wellbeing of all sections of our society, to support individuals and communities to achieve positive change and ensure that the most vulnerable people are not left behind.
TOWARDS A REGENERATIVE ECONOMY - A report for The Capital Institute by John Fullerton April 2015 It is our view that the exponential growth of compound investment returns demanded by the financial system is in irreconcilable conflict with the finite boundaries of the biosphere. We believe this relentless and narrow pursuit of exponential growth of returns on financial capital, without reference to either the laws of science or to universally acknowledged moral and ethical values, is contributing to an ever-widening and destabilizing wealth gap, and security crises around the globe. Our mission is to provide a new theory grounded in real-world practice and accompanying narrative of the supportive, non-coercive role finance must play in the transition to a Regenerative Economy, an economy that harmonizes the multiple kinds of capital essential to human and planetary well-being. A multitude of innovators and entrepreneurs around the world are experimenting with practical ways to reimagine capitalism so that it works for all levels of society, as well as for the planet. Their common goal is to create a self-organizing, naturally self-maintaining, highly adaptive Regenerative form of capitalism that produces lasting social and economic vitality for global civilization as a whole. Over the last two years, Capital Institute has been working with many of these thought leaders and entrepreneurs in a quest to understand what a theoretical framework for regenerative economies would look like, and what conditions and processes contribute to their long-term systemic health. The report also explores how a Regenerative Economy would differ from today’s flawed theory of capitalism, and how it would compare to other New Economy ideas such as natural capitalism, sustainable capitalism, conscious capitalism, doughnut economics, circular economies, sharing economies, steady-state economies, etc. Our Regenerative story starts with a single core idea , "The universal patterns and principles the cosmos uses to build stable, healthy, and sustainable systems throughout the real world can and must be used as a model for economic system design"
We have medicine cabinets for common physical injuries like cuts and colds, but no toolkits for common psychological injuries such as failure, rejection, guilt, and loss. In his inspirational talk, Guy Winch tells us that “you can’t treat a psychological wound if you don’t know you’re injured”. Guy teaches us a lesson on why it is so important to practice emotional hygiene.
In this interview, peace activist Scilla Elworthy talks to Andrew Harvey about a new vision of leadership described in her book 'Pioneering the Possible'. With self-knowledge, strength, inner power and courage, leaders can take the radically effective action needed to tackle the current crises facing humanity. Scilla wants her book to be a manual for social entrepreneurs, helping them to develop and realise their vision; and for activists not to allow anger and fear to take control but to use these emotions as a source of fuel for effective action.
In Transition 2.0 is an inspirational immersion in the Transition movement, gathering stories from around the world of ordinary people doing extraordinary things. You'll hear about communities printing their own money, growing food, localising their economies and setting up community power stations. It's an idea that has gone viral, a social experiment that is about responding to uncertain times with solutions and optimism. In a world of increasing uncertainty, here is a story of hope, ingenuity and the power of growing vegetables in unexpected places.
Connections is a practical and reflective resource for early childhood educators to guide you in supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing. It is intended for use by educators who care for children (birth to eight years) in a range of settings including Long Day Care, Family Day Care, Preschool and Out of School Hours Care. Positive mental health in early childhood is critical for children’s wellbeing and development in the present (being); and it also has important implications for their future (becoming). Children who are supported in their mental health and wellbeing in early childhood have a strong foundation for developing the skills, values and behaviours they need to experience positive physical and mental health as an adult. They are more likely to reach a higher level of education; attain and retain employment; build healthy and satisfying relationships; and participate actively in the community. This benefits both individuals and the communities in which they live. Research into supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing in the early years has grown rapidly over the past 20 years. As researchers learn more about the brain and how it develops in early childhood, our understanding of how to improve long-term outcomes for children expands.
Totnes and District is feeling the effects of the economic downturn, along with the rest of the country. Climate change impacts and rising energy costs are further signs that the assumptions underpinning our current economic system need urgent review. Here we have an unusually independent economy. Rather than sacrifice that by pursuing growth at any cost, here we suggest that protecting and enhancing this economy is where our future lies. But how will this provide the jobs we all need to survive? This report identifies a multi-million pound opportunity to create new jobs, grow new enterprises and help existing businesses to thrive. It’s people-based, community-led, sustainable economic development that provides new livelihoods. At the same time, it helps ensure we can feed ourselves, minimise our fuel bills and carbon emissions,provide safer refuge for our savings and pensions and take care of those most in need. This work brings together a coalition of local stakeholder organisations, anchored here in our community, to develop an economic approach designed specifically for Totnes and District (T&D), and shows that we can unite to deliver real change.
This report provides an overview of this programme. The aim is to explore the intersection of community level initiatives and the development of a sustainable economy. In particular, it was believed that Scotland has developed some of the principles and practices of community based ownership of resources over the recent and distant past, and that this legacy could provide a model for how a more equitable, resilient, low carbon economy could be achieved in the future. Even if such an economy does not emerge, communities need to be strengthened so that they can support the needs of their members, especially if the contribution of governments is diminished. Whilst the Programme explored issues within Scotland in particular, many of the findings are also broadly relevant for other countries, and we drew on international examples as required. The goals of this Programme were to explore and design models for community resourcing, identify barriers for effective action in this area and highlight opportunities for future action. The planned output was the development of practical recommendations for the short, medium and long term, building on the combined knowledge of programme participants. The programme sought these goals through a series of interlinked seminars and also developed relationships between academics, practitioners and policy makers who are involved in various ways in this intellectual and practical space.
This guide introduces the 2010 Gross National Happiness (GNH) Index of Bhutan. It explains the origins of the concept of GNH, its grounding in Bhutanese culture and history, and describes how the concept is being operationalized in the form of the GNH Index in some novel and innovative ways. Any discussion of the GNH in Bhutan must begin from the understanding that it is distinct from the western literature on ‘happiness’ in two ways. First it is multidimensional –not focused only on subjective well-being to the exclusion of other dimensions – and second, it internalizes other regarding motivations. While multidimensional measures of the quality of life and well-being are increasingly discussed, Bhutan is innovative in constructing a multidimensional measure which is itself relevant for policy and is also directly associated with a linked set of policy and programme screening tools. This guide presents the GNH Index which provides an overview of national GNH across 9 domains, comprising of 33 clustered indicators, each one of which is composed of several variables. When unpacked, the 33 clustered indicators have 124 variables.
Chaired by former minister for mental health, Paul Burstow MP, the CentreForum Mental Health Commission concludes its 12 month study on the state of wellbeing in England by identifying five key priorities between now and 2020. The Commission's final report titled 'The pursuit of happiness' calls on policymakers to: • Establish the mental wellbeing of the nation or the “pursuit of happiness” as a clear and measurable goal of government. • Roll out a National Wellbeing Programme to promote mutual support, self-care and recovery, and reduce the crippling stigma that too often goes hand in hand with mental ill health. • Prioritise investment in the mental health of children and young people right from conception. • Make places of work mental health friendly with government leading the way as an employer. • Better equip primary care to identify and treat mental health problems, closing the treatment gap that leaves one in four of the adult population needlessly suffering from depression and anxiety and 1-2% experiencing a severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The report also calls for parity of funding for mental health which currently receives 13% of NHS spend in England but accounts for 23% of demand. It is estimated that £13 billion is overspent every year on dealing with the physical health consequences of this unmet need.
This report focuses on resilience; setting out the types of services, resources and infrastructure that need to be in place locally to support resilient communities, helping people to ‘feel good and function well’. It will be of interest to those who commission (or aim to influence the commissioning of) local services, those who provide services that impact on the wellbeing and resilience of their local community and those who use these services.
A movement is emerging in many places, under many guises: New Economy (or Economies), Regenerative Economy, Solidarity Economy, Next Economy, Caring Economy, Sharing Economy, Thriving Resilience, Community Resilience, Community Economics, Oppositional Economy, High Road Economy, and other names. It’s a movement to replace the default economy of excess, control, and exploitation with a new economy based on respecting biophysical constraints, preferring decentralization, and supporting mutuality. This movement is a sign of the growing recognition that what often are seen as separate movements—environment, social justice, labor, democracy, indigenous rights—are all deeply interconnected, particularly in the way that the current economic system is a root cause of much that they seek to change.
Lecture at Harvard University on Great Transition core concepts by GTI Director Paul Raskin. The Great Transition Initiative is an online forum of ideas and an international network for the critical exploration of concepts, strategies, and visions for a transition to a future of enriched lives, human solidarity, and a resilient biosphere.
The report investigates the threats and opportunities for the country from climate change, focusing on the risks to infrastructure, business and public health. It also provides an update on previous analysis on flooding, and considers the current capacity in the emergency response system to handle climate extremes.
The 2014 Human Development Report “Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience” - shows that overall global trends in human development are positive. Yet, people at all ages are also facing threats and challenges to their wellbeing, including by natural or human-induced disasters and crises. While every individual and society is vulnerable to risk, some suffer far less harm and recover more quickly than others when adversity strikes. The Report asks why that is and considers vulnerability and resilience through a human development lens. The Report takes a people-centred approach. It identifies the ‘structurally vulnerable’ groups of people who are more vulnerable than others by virtue of their history or of their unequal treatment by the rest of society. Based on analysis of the available evidence, the Report makes a number of important recommendations for achieving a world which addresses vulnerabilities and builds resilience to future shocks. It calls for universal access to basic social services, especially health and education; stronger social protection, including unemployment insurance and pensions; and a commitment to full employment, recognizing that the value of employment extends far beyond the income it generates.
This report explores the pressures on the global food system between now and 2050. It identifies the decisions that policy makers need to take today, and in the years ahead, to ensure that a global population rising to 9 billion or more can be fed in a fair and sustainable way. The Project has identified and analysed five key challenges for the future. Addressing these in a pragmatic way that promotes resilience to shocks and future uncertainties will be vital if major stresses to the food system are to be anticipated and managed. The five challengesare: A. Balancing future demand and supply sustainably – to ensure that food supplies are affordable. B. Ensuring that there is adequate stability in food supplies – and protecting the most vulnerable from the volatility that does occur. C. Achieving global access to food and ending hunger. This recognises that producing enough food in the world so that everyone can potentially be fed is not the same thing as ensuring food security for all D. Managing the contribution of the food system to the mitigation of climate change. E. Maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services while feeding the world. These last two challenges recognise that food production already dominates much of the global land surface and water bodies, and has a major impact on all the Earth’s environmental systems.
This new discussion document highlights the overwhelming evidence for major changes to national food and farming policy. It’s been written by a collaboration of 10 UK organisations: the RSPB, Friends of the Earth, the National Trust, the Food Ethics Council, Sustain, the Wildlife Trusts, the Soil Association, Eating Better and Compassion in World Farming working with the Food Research Collaboration. It calls for stronger government leadership in planning the future use of land, food policy, farming and conservation in England and for wider public engagement on issues that affect the whole of society. The report focuses on four key inter-connected areas and proposes solutions for: - Improving health: getting a grip on the growing crisis of obesity and diet-related ill-health - Good food for all: tackling food poverty, ensuring fair food supply chains - Sustainable farming: investing in a resilient farming system in the face of climate change and dwindling resources - Enhancing nature: to bring back colour to the countryside and protect the natural environment on which we all depend. Square Meal aims to start a wider conversation about how to secure a healthy countryside and healthy food for everyone, and get greater public benefit from our food and farming system.
The Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme looked at reducing loneliness in four differing areas, working with residents, recruiting community researchers, and in partnership with local organisations. This evaluation highlights its impact on individuals and communities, and lessons for similar programmes. The report: • highlights that good practice requires skilled staff who are able to communicate effectively and provide pastoral support to volunteers; • reveals how community researchers changed because of their involvement in the programme; • demonstrates where was wide community impact; and • shares wider lessons from taking a neighbourhood approach.
The American food system rests on an unstable foundation of massive fossil fuel inputs. It must be reinvented in the face of declining fuel stocks. The new food system will use less energy, and the energy it uses will come from renewable sources. We can begin the transition to the new system immediately through a process of planned, graduated, rapid change. The unplanned alternative-reconstruction from scratch after collapse-would be chaotic and tragic. The seeds of the new food system have already been planted. America's farmers have been reducing their energy use for decades. They are using less fertilizer and pesticide. The number of organic farms, farmers' markets, and CSA operations is growing rapidly. More people are thinking about where their food comes from. These are important building blocks, but much remains to be done. Our new food system will require more farmers, smaller and more diversified farms, less processed and packaged food, and less long-distance hauling of food. Governments, communities, businesses, and families each have important parts to play in reinventing a food system that functions with limited renewable energy resources to feed our population for the long term.
Resilience is a term increasingly used in reference to an ability to withstand stress and serious challenge. It is commonly discussed in relation to how best to prepare for major upheavals and challenges such as extreme weather, terrorism or other disruptions to day-to-day life. However, for resilience to have relevance to public health it must provide a framework which enables individuals and communities to withstand challenges such as poverty, inequality, worklessness and other factors that endanger health and wellbeing. This report provides supporting information to the accompanying Concepts Series 12 Briefing Paper, Resilience for public health; supporting transformation in people and communities, exploring the concept of resilience and its application within the field of public health. The exploration took the form of a review of literature looking at existing research around what promotes resilient outcomes for individuals and communities. The theme of transformation comes through strongly; of individuals and communities being able to adapt in the face of change. For people to flourish in the face of change, support is needed from their communities and those who make decisions about their communities. The report investigates ways in which the spheres of culture, the economy, governance and infrastructure can support the transformational capacity of individuals and communities.
This short animation introduces the concept of resilience and the importance of support for transformation within people and communities.
Resilience is often understood simply as the ability to “bounce back” from a single disaster like a hurricane or earthquake. This survey commissioned by Post Carbon Institute found that leading US municipalities already have a much more sophisticated understanding of resilience involving economic, energy, and social challenges—and they're putting it into action through policies, regulations, and programs.
The financial crisis has lifted the veil on capitalism, exposing its inherent frailties, but there is cause for hope. There is much good work going on, with people and organizations exploring new possibilities, in search of better forms of capitalism or a new economy – towards a fairer and more sustainable world. It is also possible to see the pieces of a very interesting jigsaw coming together, bringing into focus an attractive picture of a new operating system – an so we, invite you to join us, on our journey in search of Capitalism 2.0. Through this Paper, we aim is to promote greater awareness of the issues and the possibilities; to give a sense of hope for what might be, if we make conscious choices and move towards a more sustainable economy. We achieve this by exploring the key problems inherent within our current system an then, by building on the great works going on around the world, we synthesise a range of design principles for a better system, exploring the worthy range of solutions, and how we might all work towards bringing about a better, more sustainable future. 1) Less growth, more wellbeing. 2) A broader view of what capital means. 3) Based on responsible enterprise, adding real value, where it is needed. 4) Holistic systems thinking; aligned with the circular economy. 5) Enabled by a well-functioning money system. 6) Away from speculative bubbles, towards creating longer-term real wealth. 7) Shared ownership and distribution of resources and wealth 8) Based on collaboration and striving together. 9) Founded on new institutions and greater systemic resilience.
Every place will have a different set of geographical, social, economic and demographic set of circumstances which means that a local approach is needed to support communities to thrive, be more sustainable, resilient and healthy in changing times and climates. NHS, public health and social care organisations play an important role in local communities, as employers, and as core public service providers. They are an integral part of communities and can help support community groups, local agencies and local people to further build a sense of place and identity so people want to live, work and invest there. These elements create the conditions for improved health and wellbeing. This area is divided into two parts that focus on: Developing local frameworks Building resilience to climate change and adverse events
The planetary phase of history has begun, but its ultimate shape is profoundly uncertain. Will global development veer toward a world of impoverished people, cultures and nature? Or will there be a Great Transition toward a future of enriched lives, human solidarity and environmental sustainability? These questions are addressed in the path-breaking essay Great Transition: The Promise and Lure of the Times Ahead. Paul Raskin, Tellus President, is lead author of this examination of the possibilities for a sustainable and desirable world. The essay describes the historic roots, current dynamics, future perils, and alternative pathways for world development. It advances one of these paths, Great Transition, as the preferred route, identifying strategies, agents of change, and values for a new global agenda. The essay's appraisal of the current global crossroads is disquieting. Conventional development is perilous, while the reform path to a sustainable future is problematic and uncertain. Yet, it shows that a fundamental change of direction is still possible. Progressive elements of civil society, government, international organizations, and business can forge a new sustainability paradigm, an alternative vision of globalization centered on the quality of life, human solidarity, environmental resilience, and an informed and engaged citizenry.
What Makes Us Healthy? will inspire and support those who want to look again at what they are doing to improve health and wellbeing and to tackle health inequalities. It contains specially commissioned articles on the evidence for the beneficial effects of assets such as social relationships and networks on health and wellbeing; many examples and ideas about how to put asset principles into practice; and support with the tricky issue of evaluation and how to assess whether the new ways of working are having an impact. It is the follow up to the popular and influential 'A Glass Half Full' (Foot & Hopkins 2010). Asset based working is not an alternative to properly funded public services. It challenges how those services are designed and delivered and requires a recasting of the relationship between commissioners, providers, service users and communities. It puts a positive value on social relationships and networks, on self confidence and efficacy and the ability to take control of your life circumstances. It highlights the impact of such assets on people’s wellbeing and resilience and thus on their capacity to cope with adversity including poor health and illness. These are things that need nurturing and supporting more than ever.