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Sleep is as important to our health as eating, drinking and breathing. It allows our bodies to repair themselves and our brains to consolidate our memories and process information. Poor sleep is linked to physical problems such as a weakened immune system and mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Sleep Matters provides sound, evidence-based advice on how to improve the quality of your sleep. This includes simple ways to improve your ‘sleep hygiene’, such as adjusting the light, noise and temperature in the bedroom and changing your eating, drinking and exercise routines, advice which can also be found in Sleep Well, a handy pocket guide to better sleep. The report also includes advice on how Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can be more effective in helping people with long-term insomnia than medication, and how NHS policy could be changed to reflect this fact.
Thrive is a national charity that uses gardening to change lives. We champion the benefits of gardening, carry out research and offer training and practical solutions so that anyone with a disability can take part in, benefit from and enjoy gardening. The Growing 4 Life project was set up with the support of Ecominds and the Big Lottery to work with older people with mental health support needs, using the therapeutic powers of gardening to help people regain confidence, build self esteem and motivation as well as creating new social networks. Through participation in the project people will have a direct impact on their local environment by creating better local green spaces. The project also looked at creating an environment where participants felt able to continue working in the green space as part of a self support peer group. The learning outcomes and evidence gained through delivery of this project has been used to produce this free resource guide to setting up a community garden project for people affected by mental ill-health.
This resource guide aims to support employers and employees to access information on improving health and wellbeing at work. Putting in place an effective workplace health programme that meets the needs of each business requires access to effective tools and information, which will help assess the needs of employees and assist with developing and implementing plans. This guide uses the World Health Organization (WHO) model as the basis for developing a workplace health programme. The WHO model involves eight stages and four aspects of the working environment. Included in the guide are information and contact details for organisations in Northern Ireland that can provide information and support to businesses on each of these aspects. The guide also includes case studies on local businesses that implemented a workplace health programme and a sample health and wellbeing action plan.
'Well-being' has become one of the most over-used phrases in the English language. It helps sell anything from yogurt to holidays, pillows to pills. For some people the phrase refers to levels of happiness, while others think of it as a healthy body and mind. The government has even started a well-being index intended to gauge the quality of life of people in the UK, as well as environmental and sustainability issues and even the country's economic performance. This guide gives advice on the wide range of attempts being made to promote 'well-being'. It will help reps tackle management when work and work practices are likely to be the cause of workforce ill health.
Seismic events have convulsed global markets since 2008, when From Poverty to Power was first published. World news has been full of stories reflecting a profound sense of uncertainty about global futures. In response, this new edition of From Poverty to Power has been fully revised and now includes an in-depth analysis of the human impact of the global financial and food crises. From Poverty to Power, 2nd Edition argues that a radical redistribution of power, opportunities, and assets, rather than traditional models of charitable or government aid, is required to break the cycle of poverty and inequality. Active citizens and effective states are driving this transformation. Why active citizens? Because people living in poverty must have a voice in deciding their own destiny and holding the state and the private sector to account. Why effective states? Because history shows that no country has prospered without a state structure that can actively manage the development process. There is now an added urgency: climate change. We need to build a secure, fair, and sustainable world within the limits set by scarce resources and ecological realities. The book is accompanied by a list of blog resources. The From Poverty to Power blog played a key role in shaping the second edition of the book. Selected posts have now been indexed thematically to create an effective list of background material that can be read alongside the book.
This toolkit provide you with hands-on resources to get your business off the ground. It includes your very own Happy Startups Canvas to write up a one–page business plan, tools to create user personas, tons of ideas for testing your assumptions including tips on interviewing customers and a list of must read articles, video clips and a list of the most useful books to read on the market.
There are many opportunities for organizations to benefit themselves, as well as the economies that sustain them, by making minor adjustments to the way that they purchase goods and services. This report outlines strategies and paths that policy-makers, sustainability managers, procurement professionals and others involved in institutional purchasing decisions can pursue to realize this potential. Around the world, there is a growing movement to support local economies, and various approaches are being taken in different places. Great benefits come from strong, resilient local economies, and many opportunities exist to take small steps that can majorly benefit our public institutions, businesses and communities. If purchasers are ready to take on leadership roles, the tools and solutions detailed here are effective ways to expand local purchasing and strengthen our communities. Part I outlines the argument for local procurement. It demonstrates the power that institutional procurement has over the economy and highlights opportunities for change by examining the current landscape in Canada, the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom. It details how local economic impacts fit within the definition of value when attempting to achieve best value inprocurement. Part II and III identify tools that can be used by institutions and policy-makers to increase local procurement. They outline a number of challenges, and details solutions that are currently being used. Examples of the tools have been included along with references to material for further research.
Organising a regional gathering can feel like a big deal. It’s true that there’s a fair amount of work involved, but it can be useful to think about it in its most basic form: a gathering is just a bunch of people spending the day together. This guide will help you get to grips with the basics!
Decoupling human well-being from resource consumption is at the heart of the Interantional Resource Panel’s (IRP) mandate. It is also at the heart of the Green Economy Initiative of UNEP that has just produced an impressive report on the Green Economy (February 2011). The conceptual framework for decoupling and understanding of the instrumentalities for achieving it are still in an infant stage. The IRP plans to carry out a series of investigations on decoupling, each of which will result in a report. The reports will aim to support the Green Economy Initiative and also to stimulate appropriate policies and action at global, national and local levels. This first report is simply an attempt to scope the challenges. The report presents basic facts and figures on natural resource flows worldwide. Four country studies embedded in the report show that consumption of natural resources is still rising rapidly. Drawing on these data, the report attempts to outline the issues that now need to be addressed to decouple these material and energy flows from social and economic progress.
One-third of all food produced in the world is lost or wasted from farm to fork, according to estimates calculated by FAO (2011). This wastage not only has an enormous negative impact on the global economy and food availability, it also has major environmental impacts. The direct economic cost of food wastage of agricultural products (excluding fish and seafood), based on producer prices only, is about 750 billion USD, equivalent to the GDP of Switzerland. The aim of the Toolkit is to showcase concrete examples of good practices for food loss and waste reduction, while pointing to information sources, guidelines and pledges favoring food wastage reduction. The inspirational examples featured throughout this Toolkit demonstrate that everyone, from individual households and producers, through governments, to large food industries, can make choices that will ultimately lead to sustainable consumption and production pattern, and thus, a better world for all.
One of the most important roles a trade union can play is to ensure the welfare, health and safety of its members. For nearly two hundred years this has been one of the 'added values' of trade union organisation. Independent academic evidence shows that trade union safety representatives can make the workplace twice as safe as those workplaces that don't recognise a union.
Today’s environmental challenges are not new. The priorities of the 6th Environment Action Programme a decade ago – climate change, biodiversity loss, unsustainable use of natural resources and environmental pressures on human health and well-being – remain important concerns today. What has changed is the recognition of the complex links between the many challenges and the need for integrated responses. This year’s report, the Environmental indicator report 2013, extends the analysis to the links between resource use an human well-being, taking basic human needs (for food, energy, water and housing) as the entry points for analysis. By analyzing environmental pressures associated with current resource use patterns and related well-being impacts, the report identifies possible levers for effecting change in an integrated manner.