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Happiness has a pulse – Complete this short survey and in just a few minutes you can understand more about your happiness and explore simple ways to grow happiness where you are. This is part of the Happy City Index - the world’s first city-wide, comprehensive, live measure of happiness and wellbeing. It will revolutionise how cities are developed across the world.
This report presents overwhelming evidence that office design significantly impacts the health, wellbeing and productivity of staff. The report finds that a range of factors – from air quality and lighting, to views of nature and interior layout – can affect the health, satisfaction and job performance of office workers. Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices – sponsored by JLL, Lend Lease and Skanska – also presents a simple toolkit that businesses can use to measure the health, wellbeing and productivity of their buildings and inform financial decision-making.
Today, there is a global movement toward the direct measurement and improvement of well-being, pioneered by Gallup and Healthways. This is an endeavor in which Gallup and Healthways have been leaders, providing innovative measures, for the U.S. as well as for most of the countries and most of the people of the world. This report, State of Global Well-Being, is the latest milestone in their work. Measurements of national performance have for too long focused on income — gross domestic product (GDP) and its components — but such measures are much too narrow. Income is certainly important to people — and the growth of incomes over the last 250 years has been one of the greatest achievements of humankind — but it is not the only thing that matters. People can have low well-being and high income, and conversely high well-being and low income. Income is not worth much without health to enjoy it, and good health is a blessing in and of itself, allowing people to live a full and worthwhile life. A good education is not only a vital requirement to do well in life, but it brings its own joys and a richer life in many dimensions. People enjoy contributing meaningfully to the betterment of civil society. The absence of the fear of war and violence, something that was rarely enjoyed by people’s ancestors, also contributes to high well-being. When we ask people to think about how their lives are going, to report on their daily emotions, and to tell us about their health, we gain a much broader picture of their well-being than can be inferred from traditional economic surveys.
Being able to measure people’s quality of life is fundamental when assessing the progress of societies. There is now widespread acknowledgement that measuring subjective well-being is an essential part of measuring quality of life alongside other social and economic dimensions. As a first step to improving the measures of quality of life, the OECD has produced Guidelines which provide advice on the collection and use of measures of subjective well-being. These Guidelines have been produced as part of the OECD Better Life Initiative, a pioneering project launched in 2011, with the objective to measure society’s progress across eleven domains of well-being, ranging from jobs, health and housing, through to civic engagement and the environment. These Guidelines represent the first attempt to provide international recommendations on collecting, publishing, and analysing subjective well-being data. They provide guidance on collecting information on people's evaluations and experiences of life, as well as on collecting "eudaimonic" measures of psychological well-being. The Guidelines also outline why measures of subjective well-being are relevant for monitoring and policy making, and why national statistical agencies have a critical role to play in enhancing the usefulness of existing measures. They identify the best approaches for measuring, in a reliable and consistent way, the various dimensions of subjective well-being, and provide guidance for reporting on such measures. The Guidelines also include a number of prototype survey modules on subjective well-being that national and international agencies can use in their surveys.
Resilience is often understood simply as the ability to “bounce back” from a single disaster like a hurricane or earthquake. This survey commissioned by Post Carbon Institute found that leading US municipalities already have a much more sophisticated understanding of resilience involving economic, energy, and social challenges—and they're putting it into action through policies, regulations, and programs.
This report reveals that youngers teenagers have lower well-being than other age groups in most aspects of their lives. The findings come from our eight-year, ground-breaking programme of research, in collaboration with the University of York, to explore and measure children’s subjective well-being. This is the second in our series of annual reports to outline what we know about the quality of children’s lives – as rated by children themselves. What does the report say? So far, we have run surveys and consultations with over 42,000 children aged eight and above. 
This report assesses the impact of the crisis on the subjective well-being of Europeans. In 2011, GDP per capita in 22 out of the then 27 EU Member States was below 2008 levels, and unemployment rates were higher in 25 out of the 27. These indicators demonstrate worrying trends, but the report goes deeper, trying to answer various questions: What is the real impact on people’s lives? Who has been hit hardest? Where have there been positive wellbeing patterns? What explains the variation in well-being across Europe? How can policy increase or stem the fall in well-being in the future? It concludes that the crisis may not be affecting everyone’s well-being equally, nor all aspects of well-being. Well-being has fallen in many EU countries, remaining highest in northern countries. However, falls in wellbeing in many western EU countries have been matched by increases in eastern countries. Population groups with low well-being include those limited by disability or illness and unemployed people.
The UCL Museum Wellbeing Measures Toolkit is a set of scales of measurement used to assess levels of wellbeing arising from participation in museum and gallery activities that has been trialled across the UK. The Toolkit has been designed to help people involved in running in-house or outreach museum projects, evaluate the impact of this work on the psychological wellbeing of their audiences. The Toolkit is flexible in its application ad supports a ‘pick and mix’ approach. It can be used to evaluate the impact of a one-off activity or programme of events. The Toolkit was produced by researchers from University College London (UCL) Museums & Public Engagement and funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)
The survey of 18,500 adults - the largest survey ever of its kind in the UK - was undertaken in 2009 in a response to a growing need to understand more about the positive mental wellbeing of people in the region. The full technical report, a large reference document containing full charts and tables.
Barrett Values Centre (BVC), in consultation with the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and partnership with the charity Action for Happiness, has conducted a major study into the values of the people of the UK as a whole, with separate breakdowns for the people of Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and the nine different regions of England.  In October 2012, the UK National and Community Values Assessment 2012 asked 4000 people living in the UK about the values that are most important to them personally; the values they currently experience in their nation and community; and the values they would like to experience in their nation and community. We are sharing the full results here in order to create a new conversation in families, communities, business, schools, and government so we can all take the next steps in becoming a consciously values-driven society. 
What this guide aims to do. This guide is for anyone interested in auditing employee wellbeing in their organisation. In this guide, we provide useful guidance and support on conducting a wellbeing survey to ensure you get the most out of the process. We will take you through the four key stages of running an effective wellbeing audit: survey preparation, launching the survey, sending reminders to increase response rates and finally following up after the survey closes.
The report, published by the Earth Institute and co-edited by the institute’s director, Jeffrey Sachs, reflects a new worldwide demand for more attention to happiness and absence of misery as criteria for government policy. It reviews the state of happiness in the world today and shows how the new science of happiness explains personal and national variations in happiness.
Wellbeing and resilience are linked: over time the quality of anyone’s life will depend on a certain amount of mental toughness. But are wellbeing and resilience two sides of the same coin or is it possible to be resilient but have low levels of wellbeing? If so, what characteristics are likely to lead to low levels of wellbeing and high resilience, or equally important, high levels of wellbeing but poor resilience. And what are the implications of this for policymakers? This think piece explores questions about the relationship between wellbeing and resilience. We set out our findings on the state of the nation: what aspects of our lives contribute to greater wellbeing and resilience, who is faring better and who is vulnerable. In doing this we have looked at both individuals and communities. Finally, this paper also looks at where wellbeing and resilience unravel – those individuals and communities that report high wellbeing but low resilience and those with low wellbeing but high resilience.
In this first Report on "Equitable and Sustainable Well-being" (Benessere Equo e Sostenibile - Bes) the National Council for Economics and Labour (Cnel) and the Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat) present the results of an inter-institutional initiative which places Italy in the forefront of the international panorama for the development of well-being indicators going "beyond GDP".
More than one-third of American workers experience chronic work stress, with low salaries, lack of opportunity for advancement and heavy workloads topping the list of contributing factors, according to a new national survey by the American Psychological Association’s Center for Organizational Excellence.
This report card provides a set of baseline indicators for each KRA – indicators that are strongly guided by the realities of “what wellbeing looks like” for children and youth. The indicators provide a point –in-time snapshot of child and youth wellbeing in Australia, including how Aboriginal young people are faring.